Sunfish Transport?

Discussion in 'Sunfish Talk' started by acs026, Jun 26, 2007.

  1. acs026

    acs026 Member

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    So I was wanting to ask the best way to transport a sail for a sunfish. I am soon to be purchasing my first fish and learning how to sail. Was hoping to get some advice on good ways to transport sail. I dont have a trailer at the moment and will probably be transporting the boat on top of my SUV. Any advice.
     
  2. Repete

    Repete Sunfish1909

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    acs026,
    Not that it can't be done, but I would not cartop your fish:(, unless you "over-tie" back to your front bumper and rear bumper or hitch. I recently saw the carcass of a canoe along I-94 up here in Michgan. Not a pretty sight and it made me appreciated my efforts to get a trailer and build a crib to "cradle" my "baby". Check out the Sunfish Sailor Forum and look at the photo files. I listed a link below. The sunfish is built very strong in relation to existing on water. On terra firma, like a beached whale, gravity will kill it. Here is a post of a "flying fish" on it's first and last flight. I did transport my fish, pre-trailer, tucked in my back end of my SUV with the rear seats folded flat and about five feet of it cantilevering into the open air. I did not have the room for my crew so the family drove in the chase vehicle on family outings. Get a trailer, you will appreciate it.:)

    Flying FISH

    http://www.sunfishforum.com/showthread.php?t=402&highlight=transporting+sunfish


    Trailer "CRIB" Photo File

    http://ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/sunfish_sailor/photos/browse/587d
     
  3. Wavedancer

    Wavedancer Upside down? Staff Member

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    Transporting a sail is easy; just take it off the spars and flake it. Most sailing books will show you how. With a Sunfish sail, you start at the bottom (aka foot) of the sail.

    You can also leave your sail on the spars, but this is less desirable for a really nice sail. Roll the sail towards the spars; not around the spars.
     
  4. acs026

    acs026 Member

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    Thanks for the tips...I was able to get it home without any troubles on top of my SUV. I am in the process of looking for a trailer already just needed to get the boat to my home. Will post pictures of my new fish and let people know how my learning to sail goes.
     
  5. supercub

    supercub Member

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    As Wavedancer suggested, roll the sail towards and not aroung the booms. I roll my sail around a "pool noodle" and gently secure it to the booms with a 12" loop bungee. I then stick the booms with sail in a sail bag. this serves at least 2 purposes; 1-The sail is kept cleaner, 2-It is not exposed to the Sun and 3-I think the most important, the sail is not beat up by the wind as you drive to and from sailing.
     
  6. bad929

    bad929 New Member

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    Ok so i want to purchase a sunfish....Should i buy a trailer, and if so, where or what kind should i get...Not to thrilled on just keeping it on top of my SUV????
     
  7. supercub

    supercub Member

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    I would defiantly suggest getting a trailer. I did the cartop thing on my Durango, just glad I had a hoist at home and help at the lake. A trailer saves a lot of work and is easier on you and your vehicle.

    Trailex trailers are aulminum, the lightest and probably the most expensive. I would go with the SUT-500-S and put custom bunks on it. The SUT-200-S, IMO, is too small for any distance towing, but many like it as it can be used as a dolly as well.

    Next are the galvanized steel trailers, a little more than half the price of a Trailex. I have two, one with the tilt, one without. The tilt works for me as I sometimes launch over a wall. They were originally for flat bottom "jon boats", come with bunks that are too small that do not fit a Sunfish and I have built bunks for both. I also have jacks with a wheel on the front and that allows me to move it around the yard or at the lake easily, but not on sand.

    Third are the painted steel trailers, similar to the galvanized. They need to be repainted every few years, especially near salt water. Keep up with the paint and rust and they will last almost as well as a galvanized trailer.

    Last are the "kit" trailers from places like Northern or Harbor Frieght. I have no experience with these. Some people like them and others have reported that they replaced the "kit" trailer with a regular "boat" trailer. I don't think they would hold up well for long trips, but I don't know.
     
  8. nate95366

    nate95366 New Member

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    Along the line of trailers, I'm wondering if there are trailers that "flip" the boat upside down for road transport (trailering a 'Fish right side up bounces the stiffness out of the hull and can lead to an early need for repairs, I've heard), but are able to flip back to right side up for an easy launch at a ramp?

    Nate
     
  9. supercub

    supercub Member

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    Nate,

    It would be nice to have a flip trailer, but as for now, its find some one to help you flip the SF and load it on the trailer. With the proper bunks (wide, long, conforming to the hull and padded) the upright carry can be done without the usuall worries "trailering a 'Fish right side up bounces the stiffness out of the hull". I did a 3000 mile trip last summer and the blocks are as tight as they were before. Jump over to Yahoo SF Sailor for at look at the "delux" bunks I made in "Skylarks Trailer" in the photo section. Any Questions, just ask.
     

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