Sunfish Tools...

Discussion in 'Sunfish Talk' started by Light and Variable Winds, Feb 12, 2017.

  1. Light and Variable Winds

    Light and Variable Winds Well-Known Member

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    With another slow winter weekend, I thought I'd add a new thread where your favorite tools can be displayed.

    My favorite all-time tool isn't particularly safe to use; however, no damages or injuries have yet occurred—and I have two of these mounted on different grinders.

    Used to cut 'most anything that can be carried to a grinder, this inexpensive blade cuts wood, stainless steel, plastic, rebar, and fiberglass. The manufacturer doesn't recommend using the blade mounted in this manner, but an experienced handyman can benefit from it. OK, enough with the cautions, here is the ultimate blade:

    Photos 11212016 60918 AM.bmp.jpg

    Yes, it's six inches in diameter, so it fits the 6" grinder just fine. A home-made arbor attachment-piece will need to be fitted. (I cut PVC pipe, and clamped it with the big factory washers that came with the grinder—centering it to the shaft with care).

    I've adjusted the (upper) safety shield to protect against broken/flying pieces of bolts, chain, and maybe pieces of "cut-off wheel". Still, tiny particles escape the shields, so wear eye protection. Don't use for cutting fabric, fiberglass cloth, Kevlar, or anything else that can be "grabbed".

    Even cutting plastic is a very noisy operation, so ear protection is unavoidable. "Mileage" seems to be measured in seasons—and I use it every day!

    My least favorite tool is the one pictured below, mostly because I have no idea what it is used for! The hook parts operate with the grips, and appear to grasp something slid onto the tapered cylinder of about 5/8-inch diameter. It is factory marked with "Dean":

    Photos 272017 55422 AM.bmp.jpg

    I've even stumped an engineer with this one! :p
     
  2. Webfoot1

    Webfoot1 Active Member

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    Look's like some sort of crimping tool. Most likely a factory tool
    so identification will be hard. Could be a special tool where only a
    few were made.
     
  3. eseibel67

    eseibel67 New Member

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    I've spent the last 30 years fixing cars and have amassed quite a array of high quality tools. If I could keep only one it would be this:


    [​IMG]
     
  4. Light and Variable Winds

    Light and Variable Winds Well-Known Member

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    Don't know what I'd do without a drill, seeing that a hammer is a poor choice for an inspection port installation. ;)

    When it comes to "only one tool", I'd select this one—hammer and Vice Grips in one: :cool: (Holes for hanging on pegboard or pulling in line with the gripped object).

    [​IMG]

    Multi-tools should be handy, but they're mostly too small. The "Actopus" is only three inches long—and they're advertising this "belt-loop tool"
    is also a hammer! :rolleyes: Fullscreen capture 2172017 41658 AM.bmp.jpg
     
  5. eseibel67

    eseibel67 New Member

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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
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  6. Light and Variable Winds

    Light and Variable Winds Well-Known Member

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  7. eseibel67

    eseibel67 New Member

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    L&V: My apologies for leading you down a bumpy path. All of my hobbies require temps of at least 70 degrees F. My latitude is 80 degrees N, therefore 100% of my free time from October through April is spent on TV sports and Google. So there.

    Back to topic: Although a ball peen hammer cannot install an inspection port, it could easily open one.
     
  8. Light and Variable Winds

    Light and Variable Winds Well-Known Member

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    "Bumpy" includes YouTube's selections of my favorite subjects. Well, at least I can select the commercials—unlike TV.
    ___________________

    I think I paid less than $10 recently for this DeWalt drill-bit set and index. Yes, it is made in China. :oops:

    The bits are Titanium-coated against wear: but it's the index that is remarkable, as it has a tilt-out feature that holds the drill bit firmly. (So it—or they—can't fall out all at once). :confused: The drill bit marked as "1" is tilted, but firmly held, and can be removed readily. :cool: The bright yellow color makes spotting it on the work bench easy. The case latches especially firmly: even if the drill bits were mediocre—and they're not—the case makes this purchase worthwhile.

    [​IMG]

    All but the smallest bits are milled with three "flats", so they can't slip or spin in the chuck. On all but the smallest bits, the tips are ground smaller to minimize "walking" of the bit. The shank of the largest bit ("2") is cut down to fit a 3/8ths chuck.

    I mention this, because of all the drill bits and indexes I've owned, this one I always keep handy. :)
     
  9. Light and Variable Winds

    Light and Variable Winds Well-Known Member

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    Just stumbled on a miniature chart of Earth that shows there's not much out there! :eek: (Unless you're on sunny Svalbard Island). :cool:

    Discussed elsewhere was drilling a long hole through the width of a Sunfish rudder or daggerboard. (For a split board). Although not every Ryobi model has one, my Ryobi portable drill has a built-in level. (Might help :oops:).

    Photos 2212017 70043 PM.bmp.jpg
     
  10. eseibel67

    eseibel67 New Member

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    OMG I am dumb. My latitude is 44 degrees N. My longitude is 80 degrees W. Sorry.

    And I have the exact same Ryobi drill, I've had it for about 18 years, it's on it's 3rd or 4th set of batteries. It also has a sight bubble on the back end for drilling straight down.
     
  11. tag

    tag my2fish

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    I was wondering about that...
     
  12. Light and Variable Winds

    Light and Variable Winds Well-Known Member

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    I overlooked that feature, perhaps because I'm not sure my vise is level. :confused: When my bubble-level is found, that check can be made—then try to match the two bubbles. ;)

    [​IMG]

    Even though the drill bit case is a bright yellow, finding it can still pose a challenge on a cluttered workbench. So I keep it with my other DeWalt nut-driver, extensions, and hex-bit cases just above eye level.

    Photos 2192017 55827 PM.bmp.jpg

    If you're accustomed to using your cordless drill to drive screws—and especially machine screws—a DeWalt 4" extension for the hex bits can be handy to clear Sunfish bow handle, mainsheet block and rudder gudgeon hardware. Previously, I used two 2" extensions together, and set the drill's "torque-break" adjustment to a moderate setting.

    In the process of making a garden hose repair, that suggestion is starting to make sense. :cool: 'Still working on it! :D

    .
     
  13. danpal

    danpal Active Member

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    I think it's actually a tool used to hold onto the end of a hot pipe. Maybe a plumbing tool or used in a foundry or blacksmith's shop.
     
  14. Sylvan Sunfish

    Sylvan Sunfish New Member

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    IMG_2817.JPG

    I have found my M1 to be an extremely useful tool for the Sunfish. I can keep them darn motorboats at a distance with this thing. :D
     
  15. Light and Variable Winds

    Light and Variable Winds Well-Known Member

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    Motorboats, especially the overpowered ones, seem to regard a sight-distance of 100-feet as an adequate safety factor. :rolleyes:

    With four Ryobi drills, I've got the opposite situation: lots of drills, but only one battery. Still, one drill makes the holes, a second drill countersinks the holes, and the third drives the screws in.

    'Guess I should have mentioned the "down" sight bubble. :oops:

    Photos 342017 73806 PM.bmp.jpg

    That I know of, these little "buzz-saw" blades (below) don't come with Dremel® tool kits. A buddy located this set for me, and I've just broken into the blister-pack for the smallest blade (mounted in a Ryobi drill) for some close inletting.

    My Sunfish needs a replacement tiller extension, and I was given a Nicro-Marine extension—which may end-up as being too long. :(

    A router would have been better for this tiller inletting job, but my router needs a new cord. :oops:

    Photos 2282017 71928 PM.bmp.jpg
     
  16. South Tower Demon

    South Tower Demon Member

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    I have one of these. Most useful for handing to people and seeing how many of the 20 "tools" they can find.
     
  17. Light and Variable Winds

    Light and Variable Winds Well-Known Member

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    Probably the most expensive pop-rivet tool available, I'd still put this on your wish-list. There's got to be forty feet of aluminum trim on "seasoned" Sunfish. :oops:

    Photos 3252017 65530 PM.bmp.jpg

    In use, the grips don't feel like they're going to break off (or permanently bend), it handles four different rivet sizes, and the head rotates to counter difficult applications—including straight down! :cool:

    .
     
  18. Light and Variable Winds

    Light and Variable Winds Well-Known Member

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    That littlest "buzz-saw" blade installed, and ready to cause injury to wood—or fingers! :eek:

    Fullscreen capture 3272017 31140 AM.bmp.jpg
     
  19. Light and Variable Winds

    Light and Variable Winds Well-Known Member

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    While on the subject of left-hand drill bits, here's Harbor Freight's version.

    Looks kinda weird, huh?

    [​IMG]

    The 1/8" LHT bit I keep handy is titanium coated (and a gold-color). I'd look for those first.

    I also have a set of LHT and "Easy-Out" combination tools, which appear self-centering, but they remain untested as yet.

    Fullscreen capture 3292017 51058 AM.bmp.jpg
    .
     
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2017
  20. Light and Variable Winds

    Light and Variable Winds Well-Known Member

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    Photobucket, as littered with ads as it was getting, has a new policy of $2-a-day membership. This form of ransomware is ruining a lot of forums! [/rant] :mad:

    Just found a neat way to keep portable drills off the workbench top:

    Fullscreen capture 7312017 60256 AM.bmp.jpg
    Made long enough, you can even keep your favorite drill bit in the drill. (Mine's a Phillips screwdriver—second is a 1/8" drill bit).

    Cool idea, or what? :cool:

    .
     
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