Stern Cleats

Discussion in 'Capri/Catalina 14 Talk' started by Caerus, Nov 16, 2006.

  1. JSinclair

    JSinclair New Member

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    new post/old question

    Howdy,

    Don't know if you got around to installing cleats but here is a suggestion.. on my capri I installed cleats on the bow and stern port and starboard sides primarily for launching and docking. What i used was a standard nylon cleat ... I think they are 4" I mounted them on the gunwale like you were planning. I used some scrap teak and cut a 1/2" x 1/2" x 3" pieces ( you could use PT decking or something similar. I drilled the gunwale and then drilled the teak to create a pseudo backing plate. Then I used 1 1/2" stainless machine screws. They have worked well, I actually had a powerboater friend ... (is that a oxymoron) tow me in one day when the wind evaporated and I was stranded in the middle of the lake. I have since installed a motor mount. We hooked a tow line to the bow cleat and it went without a hitch. no pun intended. Someone mentioned that lines can get tangled in these and that is true. I was out on a day with heavy wind ( about 20knots) and the boom traveler snagged on the cleat. I was easing the main to avoid getting knocked down and It wasn't working ie the main wasn't letting out. I just happened to look at the cleat and noticed that the line to the boom was snagged. I un hooked it just in time, i was about 3 sec from capsizing. So lesson learned if you do install cleats it is wise to wrap them with a line or somehow cover up the tines so the boom traveller doesn't snag when you let out the main. Good luck

    Jeremy
     
  2. paulsheller

    paulsheller Administrator Staff Member

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    You would think there would be a product on the market for this - a sort of cleat cover. But I've never seen one. Anyone else?
     
  3. senormechanico

    senormechanico New Member

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    I've seen them. Put a bale over it. Basically a round piece of metal which forms a flattish dome over the cleat. Each end of the bale is fastened to the deck far enough past the cleats so that you still have enough room to pass a line under it to actually be able to use the cleat.

    If you don't mind the weight and wallet lightening, there's alway this:

    Flush cleat

    http://tinyurl.com/2pcmd4

    Steve B.
     

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