Slow going

Discussion in 'Sailing Talk' started by scap114, Jun 20, 2009.

  1. scap114

    scap114 Member

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    Have not been out in the boat in a few days, tomorrow looks better. Took a ride to Skaneateles Lake today(one of New York State's Finger Lakes) and caught this 23 footer on a starboard tack. The wind was not strong so I was puzzeled that the jib was furled. When he bore away to go on a run I saw why. Despite the other person in the boat, he was trying to manage the main, jib and tiller. Twice when he was setting for the run the tiller escaped him and the boat started to round up into the wind. Despite the light winds the boat was moving nicely. About 20 minutes aftr I shot this picture we had a flash of lightning and thunder. I don't know where he wsa heading but I hope he made it before the rain hit after the thunder.
     

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  2. scap114

    scap114 Member

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    Yesterday was not a good day for sailing, so I did not take her out. The rain was needle like and cold. Seasons seem to be changing. Can it really be the last days of August? One brave soul was out on the bay, heading north. I think it was a 32 footer by the insignia on the sail. I did not go down to the shore to get a better look, as it was raining pretty good. I did watch as they were putting up the jib , one person struggling on the bow. Thought maybe they were cruising the lake, but did see them come back down the bay later.
    It did clear later, around 5pm, but we were heading into Oswego for the last concert of the season. The Oswego Yacht club was out in force, as was the wind which was out of the northeast. They must run a straight course, tack to the mark and run back. Lots of spinakers(sp?) flying on the run. They were all heading in around 7:30, as sunsets around 8. Beautiful sunset last night. Music, sailboats to watch and a nice sunset. Life is good :)
     
  3. scap114

    scap114 Member

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    Today might have been a good day for sailing, but I am 100 miles from the boat. Had to make the trip home to mow the lawn. Can't mow the lawn in the rain, so have to give up a good day to come home and do it. A least I was able to pack in a dentist appointment on the same day. Yesterday was a great day for sailing. I headed out after lunch, about 12:30pm. The winds were brisk with an occasional gust. Moderate chop on the water. I usually try to sail with some objective in mind, that is some point to sail to, but today I decided to enjoy some reaches. As the wind was from the north it made reaching across the bay a snap. Had some nice beam reaches. That point where everything seems to be in place. The wake coming out on the lee side just in front of the mast and the wake on the windward side back by the splashguard. Every now and then the chop hitting the boat and spray hitting you in the arm. Make one forget they are 60plus-just you and the boat as one. I do enjoy the harken block, takes a bit of pressure off the hands. I do carry the sail a bit to high, but at my age, and weight, the extra headroom is a plus and there is not an issue with to much heel in the boat. Did some close reaches, enjoyed the spray even more. Did a broad reach and it felt like the wake was even, just about at the end of the splashguard. Kept moving up in the cockpit to keep the nose down. Ended up sitting on the front corner, stretched out with the tiller extension (original 1966 vintage). Did cross my mind what would happen if the tiller and extension parted ways while I was stretched out. At the end of one broad reach I threw in a nice jibe and went off, back across on another broad reach. Fantastic feeling. Thinking it was about time to head in ( I usually stay out about 2 hours) I reached to the far side of the bay, planing to reach back, but as I pulled the sail in, ready to come about it seemed the wind had shifted to the west slightly. Could I sail to the State Park close hauled? Got to try. Took one long port tack up the bay towards Lake Ontario and Fair Haven Beach State Park. I was one lift short of hitting my mark, so I did a short starboard tack, then onto port and I was at the park. Decided to run back to my place, along the east shore. There was a I/O at the dock at the park. Seems his planned time to leave the dock and my run past were pretty much coordinated. He came out slowly, which was good as he was not really paying much attention. He was standing adjusting the canvas over his position in the boat. He kept coming out and was getting closer. I was on a starboard run, so to head in behind him would have meant a jibe, to come onto a reach may have put us side to side. I, bent down looking under the sail, gave a big "HEY", and got his attention. He put his boat into neutral and I passed in front, getting a dirty stare from him. Now I do carry a whistle, but using it was nowhere in my mind at the time. After he got his canvas adjusted he came down the east shore, eventually getting between me and the shore. As we got near to my skid I decided not to jibe, but pulled into a starboard reach and came about and headed in. Only saw 2 other sailboats on the bay. One was a sloop with a large "C" with a smaller "s" inside it. Followed by '32'. The other had not sail insignia. One other thought went through my mind on my long tack. With the old bridle with the center loop it seems you can pull teh sail more to the center of the boat than with the non-looped bridle, where the mainsheet goes to the end of the bridle, near the side of the transom. Does this change how close you can sail to the wind? That is, make the boat point higher? All in all it was a great 3 hours of sailing.
     
  4. scap114

    scap114 Member

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    Not a good weekend for sailing here on Litttle Sodus Bay. Lots of rain and strong winds. More wind than I wanted to test, or have test my old Sunfish. Yesterday a cold front moved through and the wind was really whipping. Took a drive to the other side of the bay to the west breakwater to check out the waves. The waves must have been running 4 ft. The channel from the bay to the lake between the breakwaters had waves cresting even with the breakwaters. Got several pictures of the waves and have attached 2. One shows a wave, full of sand, exploding on the breakwater. The other shows waves breaking overthe breakwater at the red channel marker.
     

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  5. scap114

    scap114 Member

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    Yesterday was a great day for a relaxing sail. Just enough wind to move you along, but not enough to have to be 'on your toes', but just right for moving along 'thinking'. The wind was from the northeast, with a slight chop, maybe some one footers, but not a lot. Took the usual tack to the west shore and then came onto a port tact to head for the State Park. As I neared the State Park I noticed a power cruiser anchored off the east shore, maybe in the 35 foot range. Not sure if I could pass in front of her I eased off and passed behind. She was "Serenity" out of Rochester, NY. No one seemed abord and then I noticed a small dingy at the beach dock of the park. After I passed behind I came on a starboard tack and passed her bow. Looking back I was glad she was at anchor, as the bow would not be something I would want to see coming at me if she was underway. Once I made the State Park I made the run back down the east shore. By now the couple had returned to the cruiser and were on the top deck. We exchanged plesanties as I went by. Remarked what a beautiful day it was and how we had not had many this summer. (July was a complete waste) I ran past my dock and down to what used to be Shawns (formally Shon's and before that Buster's) Marina. It is empty now. At one time there was probably 20-30 powerboats there, in the 16-20foot range. They also had moorings for 7 or 8 sailboats there. Now, just empty. It was the home of the 'Sara B', a 40 schooner that was rebuilt in the last couple of years. (For some winter reading you may want to go to ' www.silversailing.com " and look under "lake Onterio Log" and find the thread that starts with something like 'what have we done'. The boat was purchased on E-Bay and brought to Fair Haven and rebuilt. Nice pictures of the project and some videos of the schooner under way)
    Took a few reaches and then decided to head up towards a part of the bay called 'Grass Island'. Back in the day when Little Sodus Bay was a port where coal from PA was shipped to the Great Lakes they dredged out the northeast side of the bay to make it navigble for Lake Ontario shipping boats and dropped the dredgings on the north west bottom of the bay making a shoal now called 'Grass Island". As I approached the 2 markers for the shoal I went on a run and I could look down and see the bottom appear, and then a lot of weeds. Pulled up the board and ran down the west side. By now it was time to head in, so I jibed and reached back to my dock. All in all it was a very nice day to be out for a relaxing sail and take time to recall the past history of the bay and other nice sails on the bay. Sad part is there is ot doubt that 'fall is in the air' and soon the take out will not be for a sail, but for the end of the season.
     
  6. scap114

    scap114 Member

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    Sorry, the link above should be 'www.silverwaters.com" not 'silversailing'. Have it on my favorites and had a 'brainfreeze when trying to recall it.
     
  7. scap114

    scap114 Member

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    Winds out of the west-makes for interesting sailing on Little Sodus, as the bay is pretty much North-South. The west shore gets blanketed, as the shore is pretty steep, and the east shore gets some funny wind paterns from the shore and bays, but get in the middle and you have a 2 1/2 mile tack from one end to the other. After I was able to get out of my dock area, no small feat as it is narrow and you have to point into the wind, the sailing was great. I managed to get out on the first try, as I walked my boat to the dock on the north and pointed her bow south. I waded out to a point that I felt I could get up on her side and away we went. I wonder what people think when they see me sprawled on the side of the sunfish along the cockpit as I leave the shore. I wanted to head south as that is towards my dock and if I did not clear the dock at least I would be hitting my own powerboat. I pulled the sail in as close as I could and, not being able to see my boat, I think I just cleared her, although I thought I heard a little 'clink' where my lower gaff might have caught the end of the dock. I went south for a bit and came about on a port tack and went all the way to the statepark, about 1/2 mile, came about and tacked back past my dock about an extra 1/2 mile. I did this a couple of times and then decided to try to reack close to the west shore. I reached close to the west shore, but that put me in the main route from Lake Ontario to the marinas at the south end of the bay, so I reached back over towards the east shore. Saw a couple of sailboats out. Some were heading out on to Lake Ontario but there was another couple in a small sloop that was using the wind to ride tacks from one end of the bay to the other. I did not get the make of the boat, smaller than an O'Day Daysailer, but it had a nice main- a brown and orange stripe from 2/3 up the leach to about 1/3 up the luff. Almost thought it had a M in a brown and orange circle on the main.. Most exciting part was coming back in. On a run I had to untie the knot in my mainsheet and release the sail. It actually was 180 degrees in front of me as I glided in. I slid of the boat, in a bout 4' of water (the bank at my skid is about a 3' vertical drop and rock filled to prevent erosion) and stoped the boat before I hit shore. I have to learn to point into the wind and drift backwards in. Put that on next years list of 'to dos'. All in all, a nice day. I do like to do more 'coming about' than I did today, but the long tacks were enjoyable. For a Friday before a major weekend the bay was pretty quiet.
     
  8. scap114

    scap114 Member

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    Yesterday was a 'no sail' day, it could not even be a 'drift' day as the wind was nowhere to be found. Usually a bit if a 'sea breeze' will build in the afternoon, but not yesterday. My wife and I took a ride (by car) over to my daughter's house for dinner and on the way home the fog had settled in. No wind to move it out. This morning was 'flat' on the bay again so after lunch my wife and I decided to take the power boat out. The water has dropped about 10 inches in the last two weeks. I have my Sunfish on a skid on the bank of the bay and the one end is supported by cinderblocks in the water. I started with 2 full blocks and a 3inch block on each corner. Last week I pulled the 3 inch block out and now I see the full block is completely above water and the water level is an inch or so down on the bottom block. May have to pull the full block and put the 3 inch block in. We took a nice ride around the bay, my wife looking at the cottages and I looing at sailboats. Large number of cruising sailboats at the Fair Haven Yacht Club. I was mainly loooking for other Sunfish on the bay and maybe see a nice O'Day Daysailor for sale. I counted 8 Sunfish that I could see. Some on skids, some on their sides leaning against boat houses etc. and a few upside down on the shore. A few looked like they were faurly new, but I saw only one with its mast up and a sail folded on it. This seems about right, as I have only seen one other Sunfish sailing on the bay all summer long. Not an O'Day to bee seen. I have seen a nice one with a red hull out several times this year. After we made a tour of the bay I did notice the wind was building from the north, maybe a 'seabreeze' coming in. I did see one sailboat head out towards the chute that goes out to Lake Ontario, only to turn back. Must have been getting rough on the lake. With a wind from the north there is nothing to breakthe waves. The bay was getting a bit chopppy at the south end, but the east shore was still pretty flat. No tiime to sail tonight, heading back over to daughter's. Maybe tomorrow will bring fair winds.
     
  9. scap114

    scap114 Member

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    Well today was a 'sailing' day. but probably should not have been. Winds from the south, fairly strong. Had no trouble leaving the shore. Was able to point right out between the docks. One thing I had to do before I left shore was to pull the blocks out from under the end of my skid and put the 3 inchers in, as I had feared yesterday. Got that all done and only had to chase the Sunfish once as it drifted towards the dock to the north. One out in the bay I noticed the wind was a bit stronger than I expected. I also noticed that I had not run the mainsheet through the two ties I have on the lower gaff to keep the mainsheet from catching my PFD when coming about. Not a big deal. Had to keep on my toes, as you could see the gusts coming across the water. Picked up a really nice gust on my tack to the west side of the bay. It was the kind of gust that puts your bow wake back under the mast and you really feel like you are flying. (for me, a bit on the heavy side, it was exilerating) As I crossed the bay I noticed a powerboat coming through the chute from Lake Ontario. I did not pay a lot of attention as boats routinly come down the bay, and tacked to the shadow of the west shore so I could come about in less wind. As I started my tack back, a close reach, I again spotted the power boat heading down the bay towards me. I continued on my tack and the wind headed me, causing me to head down a bit. The power boat was still a ways away from me, below my point of sail, but still coming on. As we converged I knew we were on a course that we would either collide or be real close. I did not think I could pass his bow. I could see him, over my bow as we neared. I hailed him (again forgot about the whistle around my neck I should have been blowing) . He did not alter course. I bore off, fearing I might jibe, which was something I did not want to do in the wind we had. I passed below him on a broad reach and broke through his wake, which was substantial, and pulled into a beam reach. I looked over my shoulder and there were three of four people on the back deck of the boat, all pretty young (remember I'm in my 60's) One of them yelled something to the effect that I should 'watch out'. I was so fuming over the incident that I continued in the east shore and docked my boat. My wife could tell I was upset. I have never come that close on the bay to being hit by a power boat. (when my wife and I raced Comets in the Open Division we had some close crosssings with other sailboats, but we knew everyone was on their toes and we were moving slowly at the start) I wanted to drive down to the marina and remind them, if that was where they were, of the 'rules of the road' when it comes to sailboats and power boats, but my wife did not think it was a good idea, and maybe so. It takes a lot to get me going, and this did. I probably would have given them a piece of my mind and I guess I need all I have. Enough 'venting' Tomorrow is another day.
     
  10. scap114

    scap114 Member

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    Today is overcast and the bay is like a mirror, not a ripple in sight. Looks like I'll head into Oswego to pick up some things I'll need to close up the RV. Can not believe it is getting near the end of the season. (actually we plan to be here until mid-October), but the end of the season is in sight. Soon when I think of 'taking her out' will not mean sailing, but putting her on the trailer and heading home with her. Speakiing of trailers I have a "Moody" trailer I bought in the early 70's after my wife and I decided that putting the Sunfish on the top of her 65 Dodge Dart was not the exercise we needed. The Moody was designed for a Sunfish and if I remember correctly even had an option to carry 2 Sunfish with them double decked. I was worried about the trailer last year and took into my mechanic and had the bearings and seals replaced, and maybe new races. (I had always repacked the bearings myself and had 'bearing buddies on it) I thought being so old parts would be a problem. He told me that the trailer was very well made, with oversized bearings for the size of the trailer. I had the trailer modified years ago to extend it to carry my 16' Comet, but it was easy to move the winch stand back to fit the Sunfish. I also use it to carry my 12' Petrel SB12. which never got into the water this year. It needs a new masthead sleave for the main halyard. The old one consisted of a molded plastic cap that the sun has caused to break away. Wonder if I can modify a Sunfish cap to fit. I keep looking at the Petel mast and it looks teardrop shape due to the sail track for the m ain. Have to pull the cap off and see what it is and its diameter. Was in the water yesterday moving the powerboat lift out, again, very calm yesterday. Water seemed warm, but air was cool. Only say 1 sailboat out, coming back down the bay. Looks like rain any moment. Better heaad out.
     
  11. scap114

    scap114 Member

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    Have not been out sailing in a while. Things pile up fast. Not much wind on the bay today. There was a 'race' on the bay this morning. Looked like a real 'drifter'. About 6 sloops started at the south end of the bay and rode what little breeze there was to a finish line straight out in front of our RV park. The whole race was run on a 'run'. Yesterday we took the docks out, a sure sign of the season ending. Power boat went to the marina last Thursday. I was home from last Monday until Wednesday getting things done there before getting back to the RV. Sunfish is still on its skid, hope to get a day to sail, but water level is way down. At the start of the season the skid was on 2 blocks and a 1/2 block in the water. I pulled blocks out and now the block is not even in the water. Got a picture of it. I should move the skid out a bit. The nights are getting colder, 45 degrees last night. Now it is 65 out. A nice day to catch an fall ssail, if there was a breeze. Maybe a 'sea breeze' will kick in this afternoon.
     

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  12. scap114

    scap114 Member

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    Caught a couple of quick sails when the temp got up in the mid 60's earlier . but the last few days have been in the 50's and the wind has been strong. Not a day for me to venture out-maybe in an earlier day- but not now. Today I decided it would be my last day to take her out-out of the water that is. We went down to the water and debated if I should sail her down to the public launch or take it off the skid and put her on the trailer. I opted for the latter. with input from my wife. (She got out of driving the trailer to the boat ramp.) I angled it on the skid and winched it onto the trailer where it sits now. If we get warm weather now, I should get a thankyou from the people left in the park-it is usually the case when you end something the weather will go to the opposite way to give you one last jab. Wife said I need to refinish the rudder (I did the centerboard during a rainy spell this summer) so maybe I will get to that.
    Need to think about getting the "Petrel" repaired for sailing next year. That was one of my plans for this year that never got done. I did see 2 Petrels up for sale this year. I have searched Petrels on a regular basis and only come up with a Petrel in England, not the Canadian one I have. The one I have is 12 feet long, sloop rigged, designed by Phillip Phodes and made of aluminum. It is not fast, but has a deep 'V' that cuts through chop. I think it was made mainly for the St. Lawrence river area. One Petrel was on EBay with a start bid of $800. Never got a bid, as it had no main with it. The other was on Craigs List and had a price of $1175. It did look in excelent shape. Mine shows a lot of 'wear and tear'. The boat has a false bottom and is susposed to be self rescueing. Never capsized it, so I don't know. At 12 feet long it is a fun little boat, with a lot of weight so it take the waves pretty good. Comfortable for 2 or 3 which is why I bought it, as my wife was getting tired of hanging on the front of the Sunfish and, beng aluminum it can be left in the water all the time. (the boat)
    Well, plans for next year- sailing is only 6 or 7 months away- depressing isn't it?
     
  13. scap114

    scap114 Member

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    Looks like we are ready for the 'last trip' of the season. It has been a good season in many ways, yet there are many things that I did not get done. (Hey, she sailed OK without getting the rudder refinished). So soon the Sunfish will take its place in the backyard with the Petrel and the Comet and wait patiently for next spring. We, she and I, hope to share many enjoyable days again next year. In retrospect I did what I set out to do, make myself sail more, that is to kick in my ambition, by 'blogging' my summer on this forum. In past summers, before retirement, a good summer may have been getting out 8 or 9 time, usually on a Sunday for a race. This year I have been out 3 times that, so in that way it was good, and we did not have a good summer as far as weather, July was a bust with the cool and rain. Well, rambled enough. Thanks for indulging me this summer.
     

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  14. scap114

    scap114 Member

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    The Sunfish is back home in the backyard. It was an interesting trip, even though I was heading to the NY-PA border which was under a "Winter Storm Watch", it was the drive home that was interesting. I had been on the road about 10 miles when I looked in the rear-view mirror and notiiced it looked like the Sunfish was trying to pass me to leeward. I pulled over and checked the boat. It had turned about 15 degrees to the port side. The boat was firmly attached to the trailer, but the bow was out of the winch stand. I had to release the winch and also the strap over the cockpit to put the boat straight again. I retightened everything and was on my way again. The same thing happened in another 10 miles. I went through ther whole proceedure again, in fact I broke the winch rope snugging the bow up. I checked the bunks on the trailer and they were fine. I decided to run the rope straight to the bow, even though I usually run it through a pully on the winch stand to give me some down force on the bow, as I don't want to see the Sunfish come up over the winchstand. That seemed to do the trick, as the boat traiiled fine the rest of the way home. I unhitched the trailer and walked her to the back yard. I headed back to Fair Haven, driving through snow for the first 30 miles. The weather was beautiful in Fair Haven when I got back, and I experenced something I have never heard before. As I sat on the front porch of the RV I heard a faint 'whomping' sound. I looked up there was a flock of geese, maybe 50, so low I could hear their wings in the air. The geese have moved into the bay now, preparing for their migration. It is facinating to watch them as they seem to be practicing taking off and forming up and then landing again.
     
  15. scap114

    scap114 Member

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    Woke up to a rainy day, so can only plan what has to be done. The Sunfish sits in the back yard, or the 'boat yard' as my wife calls it. Can not get it ready for winter, as I have to move it around to take care of the leaves that fall. I do know where the Harken block is, which is where this whole thing started, it is still attached to the boat. I need to remove it and put it where I will not have to search for it next spring like I did this year.
    Been reading the posts on storage. Storage seems to change over the years. When I first got the boat, and was still in college, the boat spent winters leaning against the garage wall at my parents house with a 1X6 board between the aluminum trim and garage floor and a piece of carpet between the top trim and the garage wall. The two drain plugs were opened (mine has a plug at each end of the splash guard) and that was the way we dried them out. No one I knew would think of cutting a hole in the deck for an inspection port.
    Mast and spars , along with the sail rolled up on them were hung from the garage rafters. It was to much of a job to pop the plastic sail rings off, and if you tried you might break them and have to buy a new set.
    I even went as far as to dismantle the trailer, a Moody Sunfish trailer, and take the part with the axle to the cellar and leave the long main tongue in the garage next to the Sunfish.
    As time has gone on the Sunfish as spent more winters outside. When I had the Comet on the Moody trailer, the Sunfish was covered with a tarp and leaned, bottom trim on an old tire, against a storage shed. (like, I suspose, many Sunfish that are not being used). Now that the Sunfish is being used again it spends its winters, covered, on the trailer. First years, upside down, but now she winters bottom down, with a plywood cover over the well for support of snow so the tarp does not sage into the well. I will, when leaf raking is over, put the trailer axle on blocks to lift the trailer tires off the ground, more so they don't freeze into the ground in case I have to move the trailer. The mast and spars are hanging from the garage rafters, with sail attached.
    So we are slowly getting ready for winter, with next spring in mind.
     
  16. scap114

    scap114 Member

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    Just sitting at the computer passing time (when I should be busy gettinng things covered up for the winter) when I went to "Silver Waters" site. I had mentioned the site in an earlier post and how they had restored a old schooner, the Sara B. The Sara B is a beautiful boat, and, when she is on the bay you have to stop and watch her as she plays the wind and navagates the bay.
    There is a post about a sail in September and how they have had to work around the loss of the use of the Sara B's engine. Just from reading the events you can feel the connection the have with the Sara B and the admiration they have for sailing and the feats of sailor of the past. Below is the link that should take you to the post.


    http://sarab.brownroad.com/ed/entry.php?id=log&cnum=c1&topicno=28
     
  17. scap114

    scap114 Member

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    Took a trip up to Little Sodus Bay (Fair Haven, NY) to check if the powerboat has been put inside for winter storage and noticed the bay looks so different with all the docks empty. The view from Route 104A at Voughts Creek lets you look down the whole bay to the breakwater at Lake Ontario. The bay looks so small, but it is 2 miles from south end to Lake Ontario at the North. When I sail I seldom go to the south end, as it narrows and the wind can be fluky. I can spend hours sailing the north end, from out RV park going 1/2 mile south or 1/2 mile north to the State Park and never get bored so I wonder what a person on a Jet Ski does. At 2 miles long, the trip from end to end can not be more than 8 or 10 minutes on a Jet Ski, so it must get boring after a bit, after all, how many circles can you do, or how many wakes of powerboats can you jump beforere it gets old. With sailing each wind shift changes the water and your course. Everytime you venture out sailing you are faced with new conditions that put a challenge to you, be it playing strong puffs or chasings 'cats paws' to keep moving. It seems that sailing challenges your physical and mental abilities, and after a sail you may feel tired, but exilerated from mastering the conditions. Only been out of the water a month and it seems so long ago since I was sailing.
     
  18. scap114

    scap114 Member

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    Today is a sunny day, although a bit cold as the outside temp is 46 degrees, so I finally got around to covering the boats up for the winter. Sitting in the backyard they look like early Christmas presents. Wouldn't it be nice, if when unwrapped in the spring they were brand new- no such luck I am afraid. The Petrel is in the background, under the green tarp. As you can see by the trailer, with the extension on the winch stand to hold a mast, the trailer has to double duty and haul the Petrel, if I ever get her back in the water. Still tryng to figure out how to jury up a masthead sleve for the main halyard on the Petrel's mast. I have searched out the Petrel several times on the internet, with little luck- I am sure she is no longer produced-and this was the first summer I had any hits. One Petrel was on E-Bay, and never got a bid that I saw. She was offered with no mainsail at a starting bid of $800. Kind of high for a 12' aluminum sloop rigged daysailor with no main it seems. The other was on Craigs list, and it looked in nice shape. Well, the Petrel was to be this past summers project, get her back in shape, and it never got touched. Maybe next summer.
     

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    The holiday's are over, the college bowl games are done and we are in the middle of the pro football playoffs-- a sign we have 'turned the corner'. It always seems the time between when the boat comes out and the holidays is an eternity, but once we get to this point, we can see spring on the horizon. Time wise that is not true, as it is only 3 1/2 months since the boat came out, and at least 5 months before it can be put back in, but still, the feeling of the next season is nearer. Still not started the 'maintence' I had wanted to do. With all good intentions I was going to re-finish the rudder last fall, but alas it sits in the garage in the same condition it was last fall. I toyed with buying a rudder from Alan, as he seemed to have some nice ones here on the board, and it would not be way out of the way to pick it up next spring, but that was just another thing I did not follow through on. As I am just a 'pleasure' sailor, as long as my equipment is functional I am happy. I had thoughts of upgrading the whole rudder system a few years back, but the old style rudder has not given me any trouble, as I don't venture out in conditions that put a lot of strain on it . Still going through the possible fixes for the Petrel. Looking for a piece of tubing for the masthead sleve. May look into using a reinforced rubber hose. Would like to head to the RV to check it out. Reports of 50 inches of snow over the January 1st weekend. Thinking of boats and the RV-- all signs that Spring is just around the corner.
     
  20. scap114

    scap114 Member

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    Almost to the end of February (thankfully it is a short month), so now we just have to get through 10 more weeks and I can think about putting the Sunfish back in the water. I should be thinking about repairing the mast for the Petrel, as that was my plan last year, but never got it done, but maybe it is just not in the cards. Not as lot to keep your mind on sailing now (maybe they should have iceboating in the Olympics) but OMG, what happened to the America's Cup. I have always enjoyed the cup races in the past, and the trials that led up to them, but this year, no TV coverages? What is up with that. The America's Cup always provided me with entertainment, both at home and at work. We had very few sailors at work, but a lot of sports fans, so when the topic of sports would come up and someone would ask "Did you catch the game last night?" I would pounce on the chance to say something like "Yes, but can you believe Dennis did not cover on that second leg and got caught by the shift on the east side of the course." The response was always the same, a total blank look. Really missed the coverage this year. Not so sure I liked the boats. Admired the speed, but, nothing like the sounds of sails during a tack and of course, the 'grinders' yelling. Also miss the shots of the guy down in the sewer, packing in the spinaker after it came down. IMHO, the America's cup should not be a developement class, but a sailing test. Have each syndicate put up funds to purchase two boats, produce the boat as 'one design' boats and distribute the boats by draw. Sails would be the only place for putting your own stamp on the boat. Oh well, it is what it is I guess.
     

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