Skeg for 14.2

Discussion in 'Capri/Catalina 14 Talk' started by aerokent, Jul 31, 2011.

  1. aerokent

    aerokent New Member

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    Has anyone tried to install a skeg on a Capri 14.2. The reason I mention this is that the boat is challenging to stay on course and the stern seems to turn very quickly out from underneath me.

    I was thinking of whether it would need to be two small skegs, one slightly port and one slightly starboard. I have attached a drawing of what I am thinking of. Let me know thoughts if anyone has done something like this.

    I realize what I am speaking of may be sacreligious but I would appreciate any ideas.

    Kent
     
  2. ejholmgren

    ejholmgren New Member

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    Are you keeping the boat rather flatish for the most part when you sail? The 14.2 has a rather short rudder for it's size, and you'll start to lose steerage pretty fast at extreme angles of heel.
     
  3. aerokent

    aerokent New Member

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    I do try to keep it flat as much as possible. I shift weight and trim the sails to try to stay as balanced as possible. I understand what you mean about the rudder but it seems to occur even when I am generally level.
     
  4. chemprof

    chemprof Member

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    Just a thought: perhaps a previous owner installed a shorter rudder? Couldn't hurt to compare its measurements with Catalina's specs.

    --- Edward
     
  5. aerokent

    aerokent New Member

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    I checked and it is the correct rudder and the correct length. The rudder measures 17.5 inches below the hull, which is per specification.

    Thanks for the idea though.

    Kent
     
  6. ross ellena

    ross ellena Member

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    steering

    Hi Kent,

    This the right approach. Try to steer more with heel and sail trim and minimize rudder movement.

    Regard, RRE
     
  7. chemprof

    chemprof Member

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    OK, some more questions then!

    Are you soloing or do you have a crew?

    Are you sitting up near the jib cleat?

    Are you using a tiller extension?

    What I 'm driving at is that if you are back near the tiller, then the boat's center of effort is pretty far astern (not good; leads to too much weather helm and may account for your boat being "rudder sensitive").

    It is best to sit up next to the jib cleats with the barney post between your legs. If you are hiked out (up on the gunwhales), it is pretty much impossible to steer without the extension. This is even more important if you are soloing.

    Try moving forward; see if it helps.

    Also, make double sure your centerboard is free to move to complete down position. Your centerboard bungee cord may be old and weak (like I am!). When new, the bungee measures 4 feet. When I bought my boat, the previous skipper never unshackled the bungee -- the thing was about 8 feet long and worthless.

    You can try raising and lowering the centerboard (not too much if winds are strong and you are close hauled) to see if the helm response changes.

    -- Edward
     
  8. Allatoona

    Allatoona Member

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    Just a thought, instead of letting your rudder drop down at 90 degrees. Let it sit about 45 degrees, you can set it to the angle you want then hand tighten where you want it.

    This will give you different feel to the tiller/rudder, feels heavier (or stiffer) if they makes sense. I have tried this a couple of times on my Capri 14.2. Also, my scouts made Puddle Duck Racers and we hand made rudders and fixed them all at 45 degrees, instead of 90 degrees.

    -Robert
    1989 Capri 14.2
    1984 Catalina 22
     
  9. fan

    fan Member

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    Hi AeroKent,

    Is your boat rigged and tuned to North or Quantum Sails specs? It can make a big difference in how the boat sails. Also, do you have a lot of time in small sailboats or are you used to different sailboats? I ask because the C14.2 is very responsive and sails as most dinghies do in this size sloop. I suggest more time in sailing your boat getting used to how it performs and maybe seeking the help of a local Capri 14.2 sailor to give you some ideas on handling your boat with a different skill set. Adding lead to the centerboard and skegs to the hull are ideas but really you just end up with modifications that may not enhance the boats sailing and lower its future value when you do go to sell. My 2 cents.:)
     

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