Shaping an Intensity sail

Discussion in 'Laser Class Politics' started by Merrily, Sep 21, 2007.

  1. Merrily

    Merrily Administrator Staff Member

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    Now you're talkin'! :D
     
  2. IntensitySails

    IntensitySails Member

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    This is the the first I am hearing if a vertical "lump" in the radial cut. I would appreciate it if an image could be sent to me directly. If there is a defect in the sail we will replace it.
    I am in the 200Lb range so I have never used the radial personally. In the full rig the rule of thumb with the firmer finished cloth is a little more cunningham then the class sail's softer cloth to get the same shape. This of course assumes that the mast is not pre-bent.
    The radial cut is a more complex sail to build but the firmer cloth has not changed the way the sail sets up on a spar.

    When you say "wrinkle" and "lump" please define these. Do you mean a wrinkle from the way the sail was folded? As the seam structure is the same as the class sail there is no extra fabric to create a "lump".

    In a nutshell, we stand behind our products. If there is a defect we will replace it.
     
  3. Merrily

    Merrily Administrator Staff Member

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    I appreciate the response. I started this thread to get some tips on sail shaping to fix the problem, and I'll try those ideas first. I'll take a picture of the vertical wrinkle if it won't go away. I'm putting on a regatta today and am helping a friend buy a Laser tomorrow, so I won't be able to get to it this weekend. I'll also need light air, and some stormy weather is coming up, so watch this space. :eek:

    P.S. It has nothing to do with a fold wrinkle, and from what I recall the sail is the same shape as my legal radial, as I laid the Intensity on top to get the correct spacing for the sail numbers. I'll check that again to see if it's a little off. I do know that the sleeve is large.
     
  4. IntensitySails

    IntensitySails Member

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    I will look forward to seeing the image.

    I also think that my user name should change from Styluscentral (another business of mine) to IntensitySails. I do not want to confuse anyone or give the impression that I am hiding my identity.

    Thank you.
     
  5. Merrily

    Merrily Administrator Staff Member

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    Jim, I always knew that styluscentral and Intensity sails were synonymous (sp?), but I suppose not everyone knows that. Ask Bradley to change your name. bgreen at sailingforums dot net
     
  6. Rob B

    Rob B Active Member

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    I thought the :p sign was a way to symbolize there is no intention to be patronizing. Oh well, back to smilie face school for me....
     
  7. IntensitySails

    IntensitySails Member

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    I have been going over this with my production guys. This is their response;

    1. The Intensity cloth is firmer finished.

    2. A certain amount of luff curve (+ve round) is needed to match the mast bend in conditions where the mainsheet is two blocked... otherwise the "ah-me" crease as described will be large, joined by many other deep wrinkles off the mast and converging towards the clew.

    3. A softer cloth sail can be cut with a little less luff curve than a stiffer cloth since the act of pulling the cuningham tighter will induce a little more +ve curve in the front of the sail. (i.e. the same "pocket" that is being described can be induced in a soft luff sail by over tightening the cuningham in light air and not bending the mast).

    4. The way to remove the described "pocket" behind the mast is to bend the mast more, either by vang or mainsheet. (same effect as drawing the string back on a bow & arrow). I would also suggest that the cuningham be left loose in these conditions.

    5. Bottom line is these sails were developed as inexpensive training sails to "save" owner's very expensive race sails from being worn out, particualrly in medium and heavier winds, where the soft material used on the race sails quickly stretches out beyond memory/recovery making their investment short-lived. This is why one has to continually buy race sails to be competitive.

    6. The Intensity sail is built from a firmer cloth with the goal of giving greater longevity to both the Intensity sail and the owner's race sail. Bottom line is the Intensity sail is one hell of a deal to any Laser sailor who is serious about their racing. The fact that the Intensity sail is faster than a "race" sail in many conditions is an added bonus. In very light air however, a user will have to anticipate that the firmer fabric of the Intensity training sail will set fuller off the mast (i.e with a small pocket) so the fix is to use more boom vang to bend the mast or, since its light air, choose the race sail because it will not be unduly stressed /damaged in light air conditions.

    7. By the way, in time /some use of the Intensity sail, it will become softer and the pocket behind the luff will become less and less pronounced.
     
  8. john n. kelly

    john n. kelly New Member

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    Speaking of Intensity sails, I just received my new one in the mail. Haven't had a chance to use it yet. My question is: what is the ideal location of the telltails? Can anyone help? Thanks. JNK
     
  9. IntensitySails

    IntensitySails Member

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    That seems to be a personal preference issue. I remember reading that the lower tells should be diagonally above the forward end of the window and far enough back from the mast to get good air flow. I have seen people use 3 sets in this area but I personally only have the attention span for one set.
     

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