Sailing with new metal clew sleeve today

Discussion in 'Laser Talk' started by ari_cabarete, Dec 23, 2006.

  1. Ross B

    Ross B Guest

    You actually pull it all the way back so your clew tie down touches your rear mainsheet block boom bail? I have NEVER pulled it that tight, waaaaaaaaay to strapped! How do you even go upwind?
     
  2. sailchris

    sailchris Member

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  3. Ross B

    Ross B Guest

    thats how my shockcord is "attached" to my boom cleat, it just loops through itself (minus the whole rope thing in the pic above), and crosses under the boom, and hooks into the clew. Is that legal?

    its a very nice setup, got it from Colie Sails, MOJO package
     
  4. sailchris

    sailchris Member

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    Your arrangement sounds completely legal because it is attached to the cleat (with a lark's head knot) and is also attached to the clew using hooks.
     
  5. Ross B

    Ross B Guest

    thats what I thought, thanks

    now how if I kept the same basic arrangement, but instead of hooking the hooks to the clew of the sail, I hooked them to the new clew sleeve, or permently hog-ringed them to the clew sleeve? I would assume it to be legal
     
  6. sailchris

    sailchris Member

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    Also sound like legal ways to attach the shockcord to the "clew of the sail, the clew tie down, the optional block at the clew, or the quick release system." The new clew sleeve is the "clew tie down."

    I like this stuff. Anyone know what the process is for becoming an official class measurer?
     
  7. Ross B

    Ross B Guest

    it would be cool to be a class measurer

    I assume a working knowlege of the rules, always being right, constant thumping of the rules, and you possibly get voted into the position gets the position
     
  8. LooserLu

    LooserLu LooserLu

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    Sailchris,
    there is a serious discrepancy.
    between

    =>the decision of the measurers of the Masters Worlds 2006 at Fortaletza/BRA, that let Mr. Edwards legal sail with that way of rigging that f.e. you show at your photo

    and

    => the desision the measurers made at the US Trials 2007 that 'vtgent49' gave us the infomation about at reply #34.

    The rules are clear, we all know this => ~ "Nothing, that is permitted extra by the classrules, is allowed".

    I would like to know the experiences with their style to rig the outhaul-shockcord of the competitors of the Masters Worlds 2007 (not have been there, unfortunately). It would explain and help a lot.

    Ciao
    LooserLu
     
  9. almineev

    almineev New Member

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    the velcro tie down does not touch, but the metal sleeve does. it's pretty wide
     
  10. LooserLu

    LooserLu LooserLu

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    Sorry, I made a mistake. I wanted to write:"Nothing, that not extra is permitted by the classrules, is allowed".

    Ciao LooserLu
     
  11. chrishawkes

    chrishawkes New Member

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    Re: Harken metal clew outhaul. I solved the problem of the sticking metal sleeve by putting some vaseline grease on the outer end of the boom. It probably adheres to the underside of the sleeve and works fine. However now I find that the outhaul is passively pulled in more on one tack than the other. Anyone come across this problem? Chris Hawkes
     
  12. Chainsaw

    Chainsaw Brmmm Brmmm

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    It's because the blocks for the outhaul control line are tied to one side of the rig. Only way to avoid that is to have the control lines running directly down the centreline of the boom and mast. Which you can't.

    The other thing to do is check the control line isn't hooked round the end of the vang ping - which will make the problem worse.

    At least you noticed, which proves it probably isn't going to be a problem for you.
     
  13. torrid

    torrid Just sailing

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    Metal clew sleeve is now off my boat, permanently. I rigged it up where is worked smooth on shore, but always jammed on the water. I now use the rooster strap, which seems to be the best compromise of functionality/rigging ease.
     
  14. Reon

    Reon New Member

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    i use the metal clew sleeve and have found it fantastic to use :confused:
     
  15. harpo

    harpo Member

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    For those using the metal sleeve with a bungee inhaul:

    Where on the sleeve are you attaching the bungee? There's not much room to tie anything to, and the loop on the hook isn't big enough to get a nice largish bungee through.
     
  16. Merrily

    Merrily Administrator Staff Member

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    This is why I love to go to regattas. At this year's MMWE, Vtgent49 told me how to do this. You get some very small strong hightech line and run it through the sleeve. I ran it around the pin that holds the sleeve together, the one that the hook is on. Tie the small line in a loop a couple inches big, and then tie your bungee to that. I had the equipment to crimp the end of the bungee into a permanant loop, but I imagine you can tie a bowline in it too. It worked like a charm.
     
  17. vtgent49

    vtgent49 Member

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    I prefer the attachment point to be the pin that holds the Sleeve together, as Merrily has said. This seems to interfere the least with the hooks intended operation. I think, but don't know, that having the bungee attach to the hook might just tweak it the wrong way.

    I use 3/6" bungee, just one length, not doubled, and pulled fairly tight. Rule 3(a) vi allows a hook, tie line, or other device to assist in the attachment.

    Also note that 3(f)vi states that the other end of the inhaul has to be attached to the outhaul cleat. This has been interpreted at the US Trials to mean attached, not just cleated in the outhaul cleat. I probably have mentioned here before that I liked to tie one end of a long inhaul to the cleat, pass it thru the clew, then cleat it in the cleat. This made it easy to release when using the velcro strap. This would now be illegal, but you could do it still if you had some kind of hook to attach it to the bail on the cleat. It's still my preferred method if I'm rigging a boat without the new sleeve.

    I put a handle in the outhaul tail, that stops the release at max ease. Lately I've seen the better sailors are easing the outhaul a lot more than I ever did, for reaches and runs.

    Al Russell
     
  18. harpo

    harpo Member

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    Aha! I was thinking of doing exactly the same thing (tie a loop of line around the pin, and attach the shock cord to the loop), but couldn't find a place in the rules that makes it legal. Thanks!
     

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