Running jib sheets when solo sailing

Discussion in 'Sailing Talk' started by Charles Wallace, May 27, 2016.

  1. Charles Wallace

    Charles Wallace New Member

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    I'm an older guy, but pretty new to sailing. When solo sailing, in my case a J-22, does everyone run their jib sheets to the back and use guides and clutches in the back to control the jibs? That's how the Catalina Capris 22' were rigged in my last boat club. Now, I just joined a club with J-22's and only one boat in 3 or 4 has any form of clutch in the back. Sorry for my inexperience, but do people solo by jumping over the traveler to adjust the jibs at the front of the cockpit? Or are most of these being used by people sailing with a crew?
     
  2. boat

    boat Member

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    Your question has been unanswered for a while so I will give you my "opinion" which may or may not be a valid answer.

    The objective of having a sailboat is to sail and have fun. If you are fighting the sheets and other lines and not having fun or if you are working too hard then it has always seemed logical to me to do something about it. Unless you are trying to comply with racing rules of some kind then how you rig your boat is a mater of preference. Just because the builder rigged a boat in a certain way doesn't necessarily mean that it is the best approach for you. Give your rigging plan a lot of thought and, if possible, run your ideas by a "qualified" rigger to get their input and then go for it! Even if you make a mistake you can change it again. My guess is that you have a pretty good idea as to what would make your boat perfect for you so what are you waiting for?

    Now with that said, where the jib fairleads attach to the deck is important. The positioning of the fairleads have a lot to do with the shape of the foresail so be sure to leave them where they are. Where the tail of the jib sheet goes after it passes through the fairlead really doesn't matter much as long is it is convenient to adjust and cleat quickly. If you have a combination swiveling fairlead/cleat all in one piece then you will need to do a little modification. Remove the cleat jaws leaving only the fairlead and then mount a new cleat assembly and any other fairleads you need wherever you wish.

    Good luck and let us know how your project works out. Be sure to post before and after pictures for our enjoyment...
     

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