roll-on trailer for seitech dolly - looking for pics, info

Discussion in 'Laser Talk' started by knot_moving, May 10, 2006.

  1. pirouette

    pirouette Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    I really like Al's design for 2 boats. I would make note to what he said about Peter Seidenberg transporting the boat with the PADDED gunnnel hangers flipped up. I tried that once in an unpadded version and wore 2 very big holes into the boat (as if I am not already slow enough):( . so I keep my supports down and let the boat rest on the strapping. Note that I put some scrap carpeting between the hull and the strap to reduce abrasion of sand into the hull.

    The channel is just a 2x3 with 2 vertical 1x4 pine stock. The cradles for the dolly axle are scrap pieces of plywood notched and glued together. I use one strap to hold the boat to the dolly and a 2nd strap to hold the dolly/boat to the trailer. The light bar is vintage VW Quantum sedan and really ought to be replaced with something lighter and simpler but draws too much attention to scrap:eek:
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Kevin Pierce

    Kevin Pierce New Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I see that Pirouette's trailer has a wooden channel for the front elbow to slide up on. I see this channel as an important part of single-handed loading and uploading.

    Any other ideas for creating a channel to run the length of the trailer, keeping the front end of the dolly in alignment while I hold and push the rear?

    Kevin
     
  3. bedient@mac.com

    bedient@mac.com New Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
  4. pirouette

    pirouette Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    I guess there are all kinds of materials, Aluminum if you can find the right dimension, steel U-channel which might rust and I think would beat up the aluminum dolly runner and plastic fittings when cruising down the highway. I would think any metal material would be more expensive than wood?

    For me this was simple and cheap (2x3 and 1x pine screwed and glued to the 2x3), the aluminum wears the wood away. When taking the photos I noticed that the carriage bolt head was higher than the wood and it has worn a divot into the bottom of the dolly and I have since ground down the carriage bolt head so it is now flush with the wood.

    I just run the dolly onto the roller at the end of the trailer, use a ratcheting strap to secure the boat to the dolly and just pick the boat up at the transom and slide it up until the dolly "axle bar" drops into the plywood notches. The rubber shock straps on the "unique" light bar/ 2x4 along with a 2nd ratcheting strap hold the boat/dolly to the trailer
     
  5. glasky

    glasky Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Most of the 'roll-on' dollys in Australia have reverted to a triangle plan form rather than the single central beam dominant configuration in some of these pictures. Properly engineered the triangle plan form should be only marginally heavier than a dolly with a central spine and / or short triangle bracing.

    Advantages of the triangle planform ar stifness and rigidity - and stability while loading onto the trailer. Disadvantages are possible extra weight and a need to launch and retrieve over the rear of the dolly. (Wereas the single spine dolly enables the sailor to step on the spine to sink the dolly enough to let the boat float clear over the side posts in about knee depth water.)

    Used an aluminium dolly fabricated by Nelson Bay Laser Sales (Australia) that was light enough to lift single handed like an oversized tennis raquet - it was a composite single central spine with 3/4 triangulated supports. It certainly was stiff enough and permitted side loading/launching by stepping on the central spine and the triangulated supports looked as though they would hold the boat and dolly square once halfway loaded on the road trailer - but the manufacturer still recommended the full triangle steel versions for 'roll-on' trailer use. Some compromise with triangulated supports to say half way (For road trailer loading stability) but with a predominantly central spine ( to facilitate step-on and float over side posts for launching and retrieval) might be possible.

    Dollys with non-inflatable wheels obviously also permit side launching and retrieval but are not as managable in rough conditions and are hard to push (also won't stay in place under the hull if you want to float the boat on the dolly up the beach or to the side of a ramp).

    Must be a way to get a simple solution through better design
     
  6. sastanley

    sastanley ILCA Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hi...I have a friend that has sailed lasers for years. He simply used a length of PVC pipe and split it to make a "U" shaped channel and then screwed it to the trailer frame down the center. It flexed just a little bit but is only holding about 20 lbs. while you push it on. It worked beautifully and was cheap. That Seitech stuff is cool, but pricey.

    A notched 2x4 would serve the same purpose. and could easily be attached to a trailer frame. At most home stores you can even by already notched (treated!) 2x2's that are designed to be frames for lattice.
     
  7. jmcnally

    jmcnally New Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I have a trailer for sale, flat bed with ramps, has a rack also for extra boats. Call me if you want 561 262-3672
     
  8. knot_moving

    knot_moving Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Guy in our club took a piece of corrugated plastic seawall material about 12 ft long and cut one corrugation section off to get a nice plastic u-channel that he bolted onto his trailer.
     
  9. Sail_Aventura

    Sail_Aventura New Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Here is a slip under method. Does anyone see a problem with what I plan (notice I have only prototyped on the lawn) to do. I have a Caulkins short 2x4 bunk trailer with center roller and my sietech dolly fits nicely ahead of the fenders of the trailer. What I tried today was to slide my boat up on the potentially hull crushing bunks and then from the front I slid the dolly with gunnel towers down under the boat. This fit nicely and then lifted the boat 3-4 inches off the hull wrecking bunks. Because the dolly wheels are right on the trailer fenders and the forward post (sorry unsure of proper nomenclature) of the dolly snugs right into the trailer post roller my boat is fully on the dolly and the dolly is very secure on the trailer. Obviously I need to develop a proper method to secure the dolly to the trailer, u bolts with wing nuts or some such but that is minor.
    Now for the request for opinion: two part. Is using the bunks of the trailer to load the boat onto this devices (remember not traveling on the bunks just loading then sliding the sietech underneath) going to cause problems? And part two (capital A for emphasis) the tiny space next to my house is too narow for the dolly wheel but the Caulkins wheels are less than the beam of the boat so if I store the boat on the skinny little bunks with no other load than the hull weight and cover could that cause a problem?
    I humbly defer to experience of the members. I am a teacher and I always tell my students, "Learn from the mistakes of others because you won't live long enough to make them all yourself".

    Wayne Sharp
    Hull 102776
     
  10. Scott B

    Scott B Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Sliding on the bunks won't be a problem. Just to be sure, you could add some padding and new marine carpet. (Marine carpet is much slipperier (is that word?) than regular carpet - more water resistant, too.)

    Storage on the bunks, long term, can and will put flat spots (dents) in your hull. I am assuming the bunks run lengthwise along the boat.

    Bunks that go across the boat, under the mast step and under the rear of the cockpit will do less damage to the boat, since the boat hull is reinforced at these two locations.
     
  11. phyregod

    phyregod New Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I found an old jet ski trailer for $100. Moved the bow stop up 1.5' and put two 8' marine carpet covered 2x4s on it. Works like a champ.

    for long term storage I flip the boat over on the bunks.
     
  12. bedient@mac.com

    bedient@mac.com New Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    :eek: I too have a caulkins. I have been thinking about reversing the suspension or altering it in some way, so I can drop it down to pull the dolly on like a combi trailer. Has anyone done that?

    Doug
    Lake Tahoe
     
  13. heymatey

    heymatey New Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    i'm really big on keeping things simple (basically, am lazy). in that vein, i HATE tying boats to trailers! if your trailer currently has plywood bunks, you may already have the foundation for one of the coolest dolly/trailer set-ups!

    holding up the plywood bunks should be galvanized aluminum brackets. these brackets happen to be just about a perfect width to drop the seitech dolly axle into. only thing you have to do is fashion some sort of bracket to mount these brackets to the trailer and turn them 90 degrees.

    if you can cut out the bottom of the bracket a bit, you can use the holes that were used for the bolts that held the plywood bunks for another cool innovation: push-pins! think of it: no more lines to secure the dolly axle to the trailer! something similar could also be done for the front of the dolly.
     
  14. Merrily

    Merrily Administrator Staff Member

    Likes Received:
    14
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Pictures? :)
     
  15. 49208

    49208 Tentmaker

    Likes Received:
    33
    Trophy Points:
    48
  16. Merrily

    Merrily Administrator Staff Member

    Likes Received:
    14
    Trophy Points:
    38
  17. Sail_Aventura

    Sail_Aventura New Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Sorry it has been a while since the last response, I was in on vacation for most of July.
    Here are pictures of my using the dolly with a Caulkins trailer. I have also developed under the gunnel towers I use for storage but have not used them to trailer.
     

    Attached Files:

  18. Sail_Aventura

    Sail_Aventura New Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Since I mentioned the Gunnel towers I guess I need to show those pics also.
    I used 1/2" galvanized pipe and I attached it to the trailer with a 3/4" to 1/2" step down attached to the trailer with a U-bolt. If you notice the step down is upside down that way I have the leverage to push the towers outboard, rest the hull on the dolly strap and unscrew the towers to remove them for trailering. I am not yet ready to trust the U-bolts to actually use those for going down the road. For now until I upgrade the system a bit it is just for holding the hull up off of the bunks.
     

    Attached Files:

  19. Sail_Aventura

    Sail_Aventura New Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    More pictures, don't know why these failed to upload the first time.

    Wayne
     

    Attached Files:

  20. glasky

    glasky Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    These types are popular in Australia.

    Usually have angled metal cleats that hold the rear sidebars down and secure near the Dolly wheel axle join when you slide the dolly foreward enough to secure the centre front pin. Most use a clip thru the front pin but you can tie it down to the central bar if you wish.

    Many existing light trailers can be converted to this format - just need a slide bar at the rear (above trailer lights) and a front cross-bar or Ubolt plate with pin if a single centre bar trailer. If you 'drag' the dolly and boat on (instead of pushing it on as in the Sietech photos) you don't need a channell to guide the dolly.
     

    Attached Files:

Share This Page