Return Sunfish Manufacturing to the USA

Discussion in 'Sunfish Talk' started by jleonard99, Jul 11, 2017.

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Would you support Sunfish production moving to the US?

  1. Yes

    100.0%
  2. No

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  1. jleonard99

    jleonard99 Sunny Sailer

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    Thanks for the info, I'll have to look around. How's sunfish savers
     
  2. beldar boathead

    beldar boathead Well-Known Member

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    How much are you planning to sell these boats for? If you plan to compete with new boats, which sell for the low $4,000s when available, you will need to buy new centerboards, sails, lines, possibly booms and masts, hiking straps, along with paying for the gelcoat you will be spraying. And when you are done, you will have a heavier boat (older boats weighed more and you are adding gelcoat) with some spider cracks, etc. you will have a hard time getting rid of. An old boat is still an old boat, so there is some ceiling as to what you can sell them for.
     
  3. Webfoot1

    Webfoot1 Active Member

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    Need 3D printing to lower cost of manufacture. Suggest checking out
    who retains Scorpian license then discussing with the company that printed
    the 10 meter yacht what would be the total cost to print a Scorpian hull. Then you
    would have to source out all the hardware, add labor costs, etc. You would
    have some serious time into just doing the ground work.

    World's First 10 Meter Long 3D Printed Yacht Hull | All3DP
     
  4. jleonard99

    jleonard99 Sunny Sailer

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    Interesting idea, I'll check it out.
     
  5. jleonard99

    jleonard99 Sunny Sailer

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    Depends on what the boat turns out to be but for boats before 1987 I believe the price would cap around 1750 or so. What do you think. If anyone can supply me with boats to work on please let me know.
     
  6. Light and Variable Winds

    Light and Variable Winds Well-Known Member

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    Autobody shops have some neat tricks before painting to make a perfect paint job. :cool: It would make sense to paint three or more Sunfish at a time, due to the expense and necessity of cleaning the equipment. 'Course, it helps to paint in an enclosed shop, without bugs and pine needles landing on your final coat! :confused:

    Hardware replacements would be best done through the bottom of the hull, as buyers are more interested in a perfect deck (top). Most older Sunfish will have scratches underneath-- scratches that can be hidden with a special autobody filler paste. I can't speak to refinishing gelcoat, as the well-finished repairs I've done don't show.

    You'll need a compressor--the bigger the tank, the better. Moisture-removing filters, long hoses, orbital sanders, sabersaws, and lots of blades. I've seen ads for excellent US-made (DeVylbiss) spray painting equipment from people leaving the business. New stuff made in Asia is nearly as good, and much cheaper to buy. With the increased cost of the necessary paint thinners, paint three Sunfish, and throw the used paint-sprayer out!

    Why not try a few restorations, to get the feeling for prices. Store your finished products until Spring, when pricing is best.
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2017
  7. Light and Variable Winds

    Light and Variable Winds Well-Known Member

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    I've started a "conversation", which I guess is the same as a PM. My number is included, and will add another member for this "made private" conversation. I'll add others as we progress along this line.

    As you can see, there's a BIG benefit in BIG numbers of restored Sunfish. I'm all for full disclosure, including photographs, of each individual finished product.

    As for the "ancillaries" of boards and rudders, I'd restore those too. Use of a router would make a big difference in appearance: let racers buy their personal choice of high-tech stuff.

    Sand and paint masts. "Treatments" for halyards and other lines could reduce your costs. "Worn" lines would have to be replaced.
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2017
  8. Eddie_E

    Eddie_E New Member

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    I love my old Sunfish, but...
    The new RS Neo will eventually hit the market at under $4000 with an un-breakable modern boat. (allegedly 3400 euros)
    Sunfish are heavy and leak.

    The rights to the design are questionable at best given that the molds are already in China and the the whole Laser -Kirby history.

    A better option would be for us forum members to draw up a plan for a nice self bailing 14' sailboat and have a minor player like Intensity have the hull roto-molded by one of the factories that make roto-molded kayaks for $200. They could sell with an existing lateen or high aspect sail of 75 square feet. Maybe have a goal price of $2000 regular or $2400 race version. Race version meaning a small vang/cunningham and roller aluminium clam cleats with Holt ratchet block added.
     
  9. Light and Variable Winds

    Light and Variable Winds Well-Known Member

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    The Sunfish huge numbers, fleets and solid reputation should win the day when cheaper genuine Sunfish alternatives are available. This fact is being demonstrated by the Vermont Sunfish "rehabilitator", here:
    Deck Repair Suggestions | SailingForums.com

    For example, in the 2 square miles of the lake I frequent, I can count on one Daysailer, one Zuma, and three Sunfish almost every weekend. :)

    What I have in mind is not to prepare a good used Sunfish for the next 50 years, so much, as to rebuild interest in Sunfish sailing. There are too many Sunfish mouldering in back yards to let this opportunity go by. (And make a few bucks in the effort).

    Add ports, dry 'em out, patch damage, test backing blocks, trim and varnish old wood, restore cosmetics, paint everything, add new sail--sell.

    Then--sell the replaced used parts. :cool:
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2017
  10. mixmkr

    mixmkr Active Member

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    What's odd..on ky lake....huge boating lake, the SMALL Sunfish fleet has evaporated. I've only seen one other fish in the water in the last 5 plus years. The fleet was basically a bunch of "donated free" boats that made for an adult " youth" program that only lasted a handfull of years. Basically no daysailors either. The lake is full of monster size boats that sit at the docks or occasionally anchored in the beautiful coves. Seadoos and fish or ski boats are the norm. I attest this to being "in the boonies" with no huge cities within 2 hrs. Its a weekend get away lake. The locals own jon boats. No fish rotting away at lake houses or backyards either. In a sense that's kinda wierd. The two scout camp's use them but only in their private setting coves. Even large sailboat racing has given out to coving out or air conditioned boats at the dock. What's nice though is the lake is void of boaters mon-fri. A 40 x 3 Mile lake is still a weekday secret
     
  11. jleonard99

    jleonard99 Sunny Sailer

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    Jet skis are really taking lakes by storm. I live on lake keowee and we have a lot of jet skis, powerboats, and 20+ Foot sailboats. Haven't seen too many sunfish accept occasionally sailing out from the sailing club.
     
  12. Light and Variable Winds

    Light and Variable Winds Well-Known Member

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    Is that lake where Massachusetts' Jon LaPointe made all those headlines a few years ago?
     
  13. mixmkr

    mixmkr Active Member

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    Idk. Never heard anything. What kind of headlines?
     
  14. Eddie_E

    Eddie_E New Member

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    We have at least a hundred lakes and ponds in Massachusetts. The only notable headlines I can remember was from Tenean Beach in South Boston where Whitey Bulger used to make people disappear. Locals used to tell the kids not to dig too deep in the sand.
     
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  15. Light and Variable Winds

    Light and Variable Winds Well-Known Member

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    Not a Massachusetts lake.

    Massachusetts is where he collected 22 speeding tickets before taking his boat to another state.

    Drunk, he took his 90-MPH speedboat for a night spin, but collided with two stargazing sweethearts, and killed them both.

    Thrown out, he and his 16 year-old female passenger swam to shore. His boat continued onto the shoreline, running up a 125 foot embankment, to scatter a group having an outdoor BBQ.

    (Didn't want to outright disclose the name of your lake--if I have the right lake--although it may have been much narrower).
     
  16. beldar boathead

    beldar boathead Well-Known Member

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    Well, this certainly helps decide whether it makes sense to refurbish old Sunfish.
     
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  17. Light and Variable Winds

    Light and Variable Winds Well-Known Member

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    Well, it does, if you have dozens of WMDs on your lake. :(
     
  18. sailcraftri

    sailcraftri Well-Known Member

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    3½ Years in Jail for Boater in Fatal Maine Accident

    Portland – November 14, 2008 – The girl’s voice was so quiet that hardly anyone in the packed courtroom could hear it. But as Charlotte Gillis began to sob, as her chest heaved and her mother wrapped an arm around the 14-year-old’s shoulder, her pain was unmistakable.

    “For every choice, there’s a consequence,” she said, looking directly at Robert LaPointe. “Because you did not think your decisions through, it resulted in the death of my dad.”

    Terry Raye Trott and his girlfriend, Suzanne Groetzinger, died on Long Lake in Harrison on Aug. 11, 2007, when LaPointe’s boat ran over theirs.

    The consequence for LaPointe was delivered on Wednesday, when Justice Robert Crowley ordered him to spend 3 1/2 years in prison, to be followed by two years of probation.

    “The defendant’s failure to take responsibility and his lack of remorse is stunning,” Crowley said at the end of a two-hour hearing in Cumberland County Superior Court in Portland.

    Afterward, a crowd gathered outside the courthouse to watch as LaPointe was escorted in handcuffs. He is expected to serve his time in the Maine Correctional Center in Windham.

    LaPointe, 39, was convicted on Sept. 24 on two counts of aggravated operating under the influence. The jury deadlocked on charges of manslaughter and reckless conduct with a dangerous weapon.

    During Wednesday’s hearing, the judge blasted LaPointe for what he called efforts to avoid responsibility. Crowley said that LaPointe had no remorse, and that he lied on the witness stand about how much beer he drank on the day of the crash and other details.

    “The defendant lied at trial to avoid the consequences of his criminal actions, and in doing so has worsened the consequences,” Crowley said.

    The judge also noted LaPointe’s long history of motor vehicle violations: 23 citations for speeding, five for failure to stop at lights or stop signs, 12 license suspensions and nine additional violations of various types.

    “Clearly, the defendant thinks that the rules don’t apply to him,” Crowley said.

    The maximum prison term for LaPointe’s convictions was five years. District Attorney Stephanie Anderson asked Crowley to impose a four-year sentence, and LaPointe’s defense attorneys asked for two years or less.

    Crowley imposed the maximum sentence, but suspended a portion of it.

    LaPointe, who lives with his wife and children in Medway, Mass., owns a home in Bridgton, where his family spends much of each summer. On the night of Aug. 11, 2007, he was driving his 32-foot Sunsation Dominator, named No Patience, on Long Lake.

    Around 9 p.m., No Patience ran over a 14-foot boat owned by Trott, destroying the vessel. Trott, 55, of Harrison and Groetzinger, 44, of Berwick were killed.

    A blood test showed that LaPointe’s blood alcohol content was 0.11 percent three hours after the crash. Maine’s legal limit to operate a boat or a motor vehicle is 0.08 percent.

    The trial began on Sept. 9 in Cumberland County Superior Court.

    Prosecutors and several witnesses said that LaPointe drank beer throughout the day of the crash, and that his speed – allegedly at least 45 mph – was reckless for night boating.

    Defense lawyers described the crash as a tragic accident. They said that LaPointe was not intoxicated and that Trott’s boat didn’t have any lights showing.

    LaPointe testified that he had only three beers that day, and that he was driving about 30 mph at the time of the crash.

    His lead defense lawyer, J. Albert Johnson of Boston, said LaPointe is an excellent candidate for rehabilitation.

    “Mr. LaPointe demonstrates a … low probability of re-offending,” Johnson said. He also said the traffic history represents a series of civil violations and LaPointe had no prior criminal convictions.

    Johnson declined comment after the hearing.

    Anderson said LaPointe’s behavior and demeanor before, during and after the trial were shocking.

    “He does not take any responsibility for this whatsoever,” Anderson said during Wednesday’s hearing.

    In his final statement to both parties, Crowley agreed.

    He noted that on the day after the crash, LaPointe seemed more concerned about his boat and about retrieving the keys to his Corvette than he was about the other boaters.

    Anderson said that the sentence is fair and that she will not retry LaPointe on the manslaughter charges. She would have been allowed to do so because of the hung jury.

    “Yes, it’s the end,” Anderson said outside the courthouse, standing next to Assistant District Attorney Jennifer Norbert. “The jury spoke, and we’re going to go along with it.”

    Anderson and Norbert said they were pleased to hear that Crowley agreed with their characterizations of LaPointe.

    Meg Harvey was among 11 friends and relatives of the two victims who spoke at the sentencing. Harvey, a friend of Groetzinger’s, chastised LaPointe for the decisions he made that led to the crash.

    “(Groetzinger) was minding her own business, watching the stars with her new love, when everything ended for her,” Harvey said during the hearing.

    “You simply don’t understand. Your discomfort ends. Ours never, ever will,” she said to LaPointe, who looked down at the defense table. “I hope someday you understand just what you have done.”

    Jordan Edwards, who was 15 at the time of his mother’s death, said he was robbed of the opportunity to know her better.

    “I never really got to fully develop my relationship with her,” Edwards said. “Only now I realize how much I really lost.”

    LaPointe declined to speak at the sentencing hearing, and no one spoke on his behalf, although some people submitted letters to the judge.
     
  19. Wavedancer

    Wavedancer Upside down? Staff Member

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    Sad story, but let's re-focus on the original topic of this thread.
    PLEASE
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2017
  20. Wavedancer

    Wavedancer Upside down? Staff Member

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    The RS NEO is a youth boat.
     

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