restoring an old one

Discussion in 'Sunfish Talk' started by skute327, Jan 7, 2009.

  1. DanB

    DanB Crabber

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    My boats have one up in front of the mast tube. Not visible in John's photo - probably just hidden in the shadows.

    No block between the mast and daggerboard. I've never seen one there.
     
  2. skute327

    skute327 New Member

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    update:
    added a 6" inspection port between dagger board and splash rail. the glass is surprisingly thick there (over 1/4") i removed the foam block through the hole. it came up in handfulls. it was completely saturated and moldy. i am not sure about the one in front of the mast yet. the two on the sides are damp but probably still okay. i think i removed about 25 lbs of wet foam. I'm not sure if i will replace it with new foam, make a wooden support for under the deck to go in its place, or leave it out completely. the deck is fairly stiff without it.
     
  3. DanB

    DanB Crabber

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    I thought the mast and daggerboard tubes provided support for the boat’s center line. Was your mid-block set into pour foam like the rear blocks? Now, at least you have a clear shot at the mast tube for wrapping on some fiberglass cloth to fix that leak. I’ve had mold spots on damp foam. It made the block surface look dirty, but didn’t look like it contributed to any damage of the foam itself. The slimy aspect went away after drying out and spraying in some Lysol spray then closing up for a couple of days. Good bet the side blocks have moisture in the cells. Your drying efforts should cure that.
     
  4. Porpoise2

    Porpoise2 New Member

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    Take it from me...the deck may be stiff for your weight, but the bottom will "oil-can" once it starts hitting the waves. :cool:

    BTW: I'm not familiar with early Sunfish models: Is that apparent depression in the transom (post 1) typical of certain years? :confused:
     
  5. DanB

    DanB Crabber

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    i have a large block of foam there it extends from the mast to the front of the CB. - - - i removed the foam block through the hole. it came up in handfulls. it was completely saturated and moldy.

    Take it from me...the deck may be stiff for your weight, but the bottom will "oil-can" once it starts hitting the waves.

    Oil-can at the keel, right at mid-hull, from the mast to the front of the CB? :eek: . . . You sure you aren’t thinking of a different make of boat. I’ve not seen that behavior in a Sunfish. Don’t expect anyone ever would in that spot.

    Oil-canning happens in the flat expanse between keel and chine on boats where the side foam supports have come loose and the flat sheet of fiberglass is allowed to flex more because the support has gone missing.


    BTW: I'm not familiar with early Sunfish models: Is that apparent depression in the transom (post 1) typical of certain years?

    That’s the rudder plate carriage bolt groove. Every aluminum lip Sunfish I’ve owned showed that groove. Not until I picked up a newer rounded edge hull did I see it disappear. Good bet the groove is there on your '76 hidden behind the new style gudgeon plate.
     
  6. Porpoise2

    Porpoise2 New Member

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    My Porpoise II clonefish doesn't oil-can.

    My '76 Sunfish does oil-can, and it coincides perfectly with a wave hitting forward of the daggerboard. Both forward flotation blocks are quite loose, which is why I caution skute397 about letting the under-deck support go missing.

    Hmmm. My '76 Sunfish—which has decals indicating a racing history—has an aluminum lip and no visible groove. The hull was pointed by the previous owner, so now I'm wondering if the hull has been sanded within a millimeter of its life!:eek:

    I'll look for that missing groove after I get it out from winter storage. Thanks! :)
     

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