Replacing the Running Rigging

Discussion in 'Capri/Catalina 14 Talk' started by markfisk, May 16, 2011.

  1. markfisk

    markfisk New Member

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    As part of my spring tune-up for my Mod 3 Capri 14.2 I plan on replacing all the running rigging.

    I know the C14 Handbook has some recomendations for this, but I was hoping someone had done this recently and could offer advice on line type, length and diameter. Also where they bought it, what it cost and any other advice on how to implement this.

    I have a roller furling jib that is in good shape so I wasn't planning on replacing it.

    Any help would be appreciated.

    See you on the water.
     
  2. gregwcoats

    gregwcoats Member

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    You can get a ton of information by following this link.
    1) Go to www.quantumsails.com
    2) Type capri 14.2 in the search window then search.
    3) Under where it says "Knowledge Base Documents", click on "class tuning guides".
    4) Click on "file type".

    You can buy the line at West Marine.com or in their stores. They run sales on it often.

    Let me know if this works for you and if it helps.
     
  3. gregwcoats

    gregwcoats Member

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    My boat is hull #1688 and is a 1987 model. I paid $1225 for her three years ago and have put another $800 in her. I could have left my boat alone and just sailed it but wanted to upgrade a few things. She is all done now and looks and sails like new. So it depends on how much your seller is asking for it, does it come with a trailer?
     
  4. bt224

    bt224 Member

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    Catalina sells them as cheap as anyone.
     
  5. Ginger

    Ginger New Member

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    Copy of Order for Rigging

    Mark,

    Just bought a '92 Capri and all rigging is in disarray--can you send me a copy of what you ordered and from whom? If you've just gone through all of the rigamarole, I rather save some time, borrow your research and get set for sailing!

    I'm in a powerboat/pirogue-friendly zone, so I'll have to do all my parts purchasing via the Internet. Are there any friendly Capri-savvy sailors near Louisiana willing to help me get set up when the parts come in?

    My experience is with a Chrysler Man-O'-War and a Hobie 16 and my head is spinning from the diagrams and not having much to work from. I feel Art's pain and appreciate you all taking time to answer his questions, because I've learned a lot by reading your posts.

    Thanks!
     
  6. woodbark

    woodbark Member

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    Ginger, I have a 92 as well, bought used. Your rigging may not be as bad as it looks once you've sorted it all out.

    The subject of inspecting and serviceing every attachment point on these boats has been discussed extensively on this forum and should be given high priority .......a screw pulling out of your standing rigging while on the water is horrible to imagine never mind what would happen if it actually did!
     
  7. Ginger

    Ginger New Member

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    Even if it has sat unused for a long time?

    The boat was sailed long, long ago (in the 90s) and hasn't been sailed since. When I read "What to consider when buying a Capri", it suggested replacing the rigging if it was "older." Just looking at the connections, some are bent, cotter pins rusted and it still has the plastic cleats. The (can't remember what they are called) wires covered with white coating, have worn-through in spots. Lines that are run are dry-rotted and I have some loose parts.

    I got it for a song, and the hull, teak, sails and trailer are in good shape, so am willing to toss some money at the important parts for safety's sake. I'm going to put up the mast today and check out what I have. Oh good grief, wish I could take it to a shop and let someone with expertise have a go at it! I don't know of any around here. I'll post back when I've a better idea. Thanks for your optimism!
     
  8. Ginger

    Ginger New Member

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    You were right--ended up with everything I need and after a thorough inspection--tightened all of the screws and noted all the bent parts and ropes that need replacement. We stepped up the mast and raised the main and jib sails (and took pictures)--very pretty boat (red, white and blue sails--like the ones I saw in Mark's profile pic).

    My questions:

    1) I have one screw on the boom that is stripped--what do I do about that?
    2) The shrouds have some worn spots, but the lines underneath are not frayed--should I just tape them or leave them be?
    3) There is a small hole in the sail (unfortunately in a red part of the sail)--what is the best way to repair it? And there are a couple of spots on the edges that are coming unraveled. I can sew--so I figure I can resew the edges? The sails are crisp and look great other than that. (probably a critter, since there were droppings when we took the sails out of the bag).
    4) Is there an alternative for the cotter rings--they were tearing up my fingers--is it like playing guitar and you have to develop callouses?
    5) The main sheet and jib ropes are very thick (1/2"?)--should I replace them or just go with them, since they are in good shape?
    6) The clam cleats are plastic--I saw suggestions to replace them--thoughts?

    Thanks for your help--I've been reading a lot of past posts and am learning!
    Ginger
     
  9. woodbark

    woodbark Member

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    Ginger, looks like you have gotten quite familiar with your new toy already and yes! ....it seems like you were just in time to save it from the critters!

    1) This could be the boom vang screws you're referring to, these are pretty hard working guys! A thicker screw will usually do the trick however, you must make sure the replacement screw passes freely through the part it is securing if not, you must enlarge the hole(s) in the part.
    In other words the screw must pass easily through the part but fit tightly in the boom. Also if the area around the holes in the boom appear pulled out, it must be flattend back down flush. With care, a light hammering will easily bring these back level. Riveting would be plan "B".

    2) My shrouds are original and are still in good shape. The strength is in the wire itself, the plastic cover is cosmetic and to protect the sailors from bruising themselves against the bare wire. If they are not frayed and the swaged ends are still clean and tight I would have no problem taping over the bare spots and moving on to the next item.

    3)Holes! yikes! the good news is that every marine supply store carries sail repair tape in a variety of colours as well as clear. These tapes have high bonding strength and will repair small tears quite effectively. If it is an actual hole, I would tape both sides allowing the tape to stick to itself through the hole. The tape or patch usually has instructions attached.

    4)The "ring dings" are definitely not a sailor's best friend and could be scary. My wife's sunveil got caught on our Port shroud ring and pulled it clear out. Fortunately I noticed it missing while there was still tension on the shroud which kept the cotter pin intact. Thank goodness I carry spares. This year I will be using these little safety pins that pass through the hole as well as lock around the pin, similar to the safety pin on a toe hitch and to prevent clothing from catching and pulling it out; I will have a drop down PVC pipe cover that drops down over the whole shackle. This PVC pipe is cut to length about 30" and passed over the cable (while it is detached from the shackle of course) and must have an inside diameter wide enough to clear the shackle so that it drops all the way down to the chainplate. For the forestay I plan to use the cotter pin with the little spring loaded ball.

    5)I still use the big ol 1/2" ones, they are clumsy but easy to hang on to!
    Be sure and read the free C14 handbook available for download at the top of this page.

    6)The Cam cleats have not been a big priority for me as yet since I have not gotten into racing but they are on my wish list!
     
  10. Ginger

    Ginger New Member

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    I went to West Marine and the sailboat section looked like it had been looted! The sail repair kit they had was for sewing repairs. So, I looked at WM online and only saw white sail repair tape. I may have to go with a white patch (on the red portion of my sail). Can I get creative (a circle?)--or does the repair have to be a straight rectangular strip of tape? A star could be cool with the red, white and blue sails. Maybe some might not care about aesthetics, but I really don't want a big funky visible white patch on my (otherwise) good sails. Perhaps I could fashion the repair in the shape of a mousetrap (in memorial of the critter that ate the sail)? Thoughts? Any links to sites with high-quality clear sail repair tape are welcomed! Thanks to you all!
     
  11. chemprof

    chemprof Member

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    Check my post here for a description of lines I ordered last year:
     
  12. Ginger

    Ginger New Member

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    Thank you so much Ed! After much searching, I came across this post and printed it out and saved it on my computer. I smiled when I clicked on your link. Super information and I appreciate your response!
     
  13. spoons

    spoons New Member

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    I nearly lost a clevis pin and bracket that was attached to my forestay while trailering. The clevis pin was attached with one of these "ring dings" which must have fallen out due to vibration. It got me thinking about what a disaster it would be to lose one while sailing. I ordered some clevis pins with the "hair pin" style cotter pins for the forestay (and spares), and replaced the ring dings on the clevis pins that attach the shrouds with old-style cotter pins that you have to bend (since I don't attach/detach the shrouds often). These old-style cotter pins seem like the most secure but least convenient.

    My Lido 14 had some of the clevis pins with the spring-loaded ball retention mechanism. They are very convenient, but I've read that they are very prone to failure. I don't use them.
     

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