Release Forms for Underage Sailors

Discussion in 'Laser Class Politics' started by gouvernail, Apr 12, 2006.

  1. gouvernail

    gouvernail Active Member

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    Release forms.
    Wew have gone entirely off the deep end with release forms and I think the future will have nothing but more drowning in paperwork.
    But I want access to yacht club facilities and I have to jump through the hoops whatever those hoops may be.

    Adults can sign their rights away.

    I have a form for them.

    I have a form that I am sending to parents so they can attempt to sign away their underage kid's rights before the kid comes to town.

    What do you at your venue for kids who are too young to sign away their own rights and who show up without their parents??
     
  2. LooserLu

    LooserLu LooserLu

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    Hi gov,
    sorry to interfere, but perhaps there is a difficulty to understand what your question is, in reason of correct translation from American-English into other languages. Can you explain us a bit more exact, what you mean, please?
    Thanks,
    alien LooserLu
     
  3. Wavedancer

    Wavedancer Upside down? Staff Member

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    LooserLu,

    We really don't want to go there (as they say in the USA). This is lawyer stuff (and I am not a lawyer).
    Nevertheless, suppose you sail in a regatta and you get hit and seriously injured by a rescue boat (maybe going too fast; too many chocolate bunnies, whatever). You probably want to recover at least your medical expenses (being a poor sailor without insurance); maybe more. In the US, you get a lawyer who will sue just about everybody, including poor old Gouvernail. Consequently, Gouv will have to get a lawyer to defend himself, even though he was not directly involved. Whereas the rescue boat people may have been at fault, the purpose of the release form is to protect the regatta organizers, the club etc.; rightly or wrongly. This whole legal business has been discussed a lot, for instance on Sailing Anarchy. It remains a nasty aspect, I think, of what we like to do for fun.

    The scenario that I sketched is not unheard of. I read about a case where a coach boat hurt a (very good) female sailor so badly that she is now confined to a wheelchair. It happened in Europe and the accident gave rise to a legal case.
     
  4. LooserLu

    LooserLu LooserLu

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    Hi Wavedancer,
    thanks for your explanations. Now I do understand better what the question is, gov is asking.
    If I would write like I do speak, sometimes, perhaps not even Germans from Bavaria or Berlin would understand me... ;0)

    The gov writes about a point of view, that already my country has reached, too. Less in sailing, but much more in Football ( I mean: "Soccer". And there: the lower-level/non-pro leagues) there are such problems in that, what you and the gov are telling about. If really something very bad happens during a sailing event (and also outside a sailing event, while doing fun sailing), of course this was has happend, will be investigated intensive by the disrtict atorney. If there are only damages at the boats, usually the insurances clear up the reasons for accidents etc. Civil affairs, like indemnity for having got hurt by someone, of course, also here are cleared up by advocates and civil-courts, but here in GER, in the sailing sport, usually the advocates "are not searching for such good chances to earn money easy", like maybe elsewhere. What a luck for us sailors here :)

    Ciao
    LooserLu
     

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