Rebuilt Laser finally in water - Concerns about wear and tear

Discussion in 'Laser Talk' started by TwoCent, Jul 4, 2017.

  1. TwoCent

    TwoCent Member

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    My club had about a half-dozen sunfish donated to it. I just need to find a couple 1970s laser sitting in people's backyards and I'd have a nice dinghy Fleet built up. My club has a deal where for $250 you can sail any of our club boats, which along with the Sunfish are about a half-dozen Mariners
     
  2. LaLi

    LaLi Active Member

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    Now this is a bit off topic, but I can't let this go uncommented... again.

    Club racing is racing. And when you're racing, you need rules to govern it - not only the racing rules "themselves" (such as right-of-way rules), but equipment rules (class or handicap rules), too.

    When racing, your boat has to be legal. Please, never use the "I only club race" excuse for illegal modifications or using fake parts.
     
  3. TwoCent

    TwoCent Member

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    Very good point. My thinking was "as long as it is not a class race and inter-club, it doesn't matter". This is one reason I'm pushing for more club owned boats and members to purchase those so we can get more, then it is an even playing field.

    Our last race was uhandicapped and a mix of dinghies and keelboats, so not the most balanced. You can't even mix the two handicaps.

    However, your point stands, racing should be done with proper equipment....but on the other hand it is much easier to spend $200 on a sail and rudder and get in the water now vs saving up for 6 months of no sailing for the $1000+ it would cost. Trust me, I do freelance video work, so I understand that the value is worth the cost and that buying knockoffs is not ideal (also why I can't drop $1k to get the boat in order)....but it does get me on the water today.

    As my club grows again, as the recession hit it hard, then I'll champion the cause of racing with legal only gear. It'd be great to get 15 boats out there in a keel boat regatta and 20 in beer can dinghy races like the old days. Or maybe I'll still let that kid slide who bought a practice rudder for $100 because he hasn't seen $500 in one place in his life
     
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  4. Eyeper

    Eyeper Member

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    Here's a non-legal idea that has worked wonders for my Laser for many years, now. I took a Hobie 16 rudder and made it fit the Laser Rudder head. And tweaked it to be more vertical. That, and the fact that it bites about 5" longer, has eliminated that annoying weather helm. (Hats off to Andy Atos, too, for following his similar modification idea) If you aren't worried about class racing, this makes your Laser a little bit more fun and faster in a blow.
     

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  5. cskudder

    cskudder Active Member

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    That's a *really* interesting idea. What's the black line on the Hobie-modified one - is that just where you traced the size + shape of the original Laser blade with a marker, or is that something more?

    And I realize this is starting to look a lot like a thread hijack so maybe we continue this line in a new thread? But thanks for posting it.
     
  6. TwoCent

    TwoCent Member

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    I'm not worried about the thread hijack as it is interesting, but if it's against forum policy, please post it again and I'll join in the conversation. I like the thought that the Laser designer said that he'd have changed the rudder if he were to do it over again. Seems like this is more in his spirit
     
  7. Eyeper

    Eyeper Member

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    Yes, that black line is just a marker tracing the shape of the "standard" rudder to show the difference. And when I first did this and brought up the idea of an improved rudder to the Laser Class, it started a veritable shitstorm, which got pretty interesting. (Fred Schroth might remember this?) Anyway, I backed off my soapbox then and have been sailing happily without weather helm ever since. And, of course, I do not race.
     
  8. andyatos

    andyatos Active Member

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    Yup, quite a difference in the weather helm department. Here's my Laser rudder. Now vertical.

    Also currently doing the same for my Sunfish rudder. Version 1.0. Have a few more things to finish up on it. Cut some length off of it, shape a curve on the leading edge of the tip. The source? An old Sunfish daggerboard knock off I'm no longer using.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. Emilio Castelli

    Emilio Castelli Member

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    Do yourself a favor and flip the mast. It's a 10 minutes job and will save you a sail repair and a new mast down the line.
    E
     
  10. Emilio Castelli

    Emilio Castelli Member

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    Chances are your gudgeons are worn out and you have play in your rudder. Change the gudgeons and your tiller won't hit the cleat anymore.
    E
     
  11. cskudder

    cskudder Active Member

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    Actually this boat has the old stainless steel gudgeons and have no wear that I can pick up. I can see that it's flexibility in the tiller itself that allows it to get down low enuf to hit the cleat. I can't see or feel any play in the rudder / rudder head on the gudgeons. But all that said thanks very much for coming back on it.
     
  12. TwoCent

    TwoCent Member

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    Excellent point. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. How long will a flipped mast last before needing to be replaced?
     
  13. inlandfreddy

    inlandfreddy Member

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    Without doing the math my guess that a flip will reduce the "effective wear with 80-90%.

    Radically reducing the pulling stress on rivetholes adds to that, so my guess is that the mast will have as much or more saling left after a flip then it would have had in total with 2 rivets, without the flip.
     
  14. TwoCent

    TwoCent Member

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    Haha, funny, but I would have answered the same. I guess a better question would be "how long would you sail with a new upper before flipping it?"
     
  15. inlandfreddy

    inlandfreddy Member

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    Thats the really tricky one. For those who abuse masts sailing 2block and supervanging in hard wind maybe Steve Cockerills pointer is the limmit, that an aluminum spar can only be straightened 9 times from plastic deformation, the last one then as preparation for flipping.

    At the other end there is little reason not to, if it could be the original top mast and the hull is past middle age. One could also remove the collar and look for cracks.

    As said before, multiple rivets is a reason by itself. Being heavy slows the boat and increase the loads and a strong hiker also shortens the mast life.

    Interesting to hear from more experienced laserite's
     
  16. TwoCent

    TwoCent Member

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    I'm sold, end for ending mine on Weds. Hopefully the weather is cool enough to epoxy my gudgeon holes and rescrew it in. Found mine leaking. Also picked up a cheapo snake camera to run up my drain hole and check the wood.
     

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