Outhaul Rigged on the Back of the Boom

Discussion in 'Laser Talk' started by viktor188924, Jun 14, 2007.

  1. viktor188924

    viktor188924 New Member

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    I have seen some people rig their outhauls on the back of the boom:
    [​IMG]
    Have any of you tried this?
     
  2. Ross B

    Ross B Guest

    put it in the front, near the gooseneck, and keep all the weight near the mast, this way when your going DW, you wont have all the weight of those block pulling the boom in

    I know its not a ton, but every bit helps
     
  3. viktor188924

    viktor188924 New Member

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    you're right it would pull the boom in... thanks I never thought of that. But how does the other way NOT pull the boom in? I mean with this way its not really pulling from the right direction if it wanted to pull it in.... its just pulling along the boom. There's still the block that goes around the mast and pulls it down... so the whole time it's running along the boom
     
  4. Ross B

    Ross B Guest

    I just like to keep it all near the mast, the less weight at the end of the boom the better, keep it lighter back there

    I have 2 singles on the mast, and a single with a becket on the outhaul, and the outhaul line at it's loosest doesn't go past the vang
     
  5. Chainsaw

    Chainsaw Brmmm Brmmm

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    That system has three control lines? If it does it's not race legal.
     
  6. bjmoose

    bjmoose Member

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    One of them is the bungee for the clew.
     
  7. bjmoose

    bjmoose Member

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    I tried the system you've shown in your drawing, but I've since moved to the system described and drawn in this thread instead.

    http://laserforum.org/showthread.php?t=5228

    Works better with less friction.

    And Ross, as you say, every little bit helps. A system left rigged on the boom is an extra 5 minutes on the water improving my sailing, vs. in the parking lot rigging the boat. Every little bit helps. ;-)
     
  8. Ross B

    Ross B Guest

    with my version, you can leave the control line on the boom, and the 2 singles on the mast, run the control through 1 on the mast back to the boom block and back to #2 on the mast, and down to the deck, takes like 10 seconds
     
  9. madyottie

    madyottie Apprentice

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    umm ahhh, pardon my ignorance, but that pic at the top shows 8:1 purchase (2:1 at the clew, then another 2 x 2:1 near the cleat). Why so much purchase? Does anyone ever need that much? If I pulled as hard as I could on that, I dont think my boat would respond very well at all. Surely 4:1, saving the extra weight, would be better?
     
  10. Deimos

    Deimos Member

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    You can also end-up with miles of line in the cockpit (when the clew is pulled tight) with so much purchase.


    Ian
     
  11. Ross B

    Ross B Guest

    yea, flipin 8:1 is so much, my downhaul doesent even have that much, there is simply no need for that much purchase on a outhaul

    and the one in picture is just crazy, to much stuff, to much to wear out and go wrong
     
  12. PUROLIO

    PUROLIO New Member

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    Ross,
    The day you actually win any regatta or get to the olympics, you can start worrying about the weight in the end of the boom.
    Stop worrying so much about your equipment and start training.
     
  13. stick

    stick Member

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    ouch, you smell something there ross. 'cause somethings burnin' !

    sorry dude.
     
  14. Ross B

    Ross B Guest

    go back to your shack in Chile you newb

    you have no right to post like that, or talk to me like that, you earn a bit more cred around here and we'll see

    bring your game up here in a month or two and I'll smack you around on the course and we'll see what your made off


    *no worry's stick, I think you've been good to me


    (Doc will say I can sail on Tuesday, hopefully, check my blog!)
     
  15. PUROLIO

    PUROLIO New Member

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    Ross,
    If what I am saying wasn`t true, would you be making such a big deal about it?
    Are you trying to tell me that just because I am Chilean means I`m a bad sailor? I´m sorry to tell you but a Chilean is a 5 time Lightning World Champion and 1 Time Etchell World Champion, and a Chilean Laser sailor is ranked number 4 (Matias del Solar) I think we Chileans know a thing or two about sailing.
    Judging by your results in the 2007 Alamitos Bay OCR (18/18) I think I probably would beat you, since I am between the 3 best sailors in several classes here in Chile (470, Laser,Pirat and I sail a Melges 24 very competitively).
    I don´t spend as much time as you do participating in forums, I´d rather spend my free time sailing.
     
  16. Ross B

    Ross B Guest

    yea I know several good sailors come from Chile, and I'm sure their wonderful people don't get me wrong

    my reaction was because you so quickly talk shit here, but we have only seen 8 posts from, gotta have a fair bit more cred before you can start talkin like that


    do you even know why I placed 18/18 at ABYC OCR?

    I had to drop out because of my wrist, I was not able to steer or drive. Two races and I was done. I've been dealing with this for a year a half, and with a little luck its almost over. I tore all the cartilage in my left wrist and it was very unstable, I couldn't even turn a doorknob, hold a shampoo bottle, simple stuff, but if you've followed the forums, read my blog, you would know this. My Doc told me not to sail, but I figured hey its ABYC OCR, gotta do, shouldn't have sailed.... But I have had surgery, and my wrist is improving, hopefully my Doc will clear me, I can train harder, put some more weight on and be back in business. I gotta tell ya, not having raced successfully and felt good about it, relatively pain free is since November is hard on ya


    Nobody cares what you sail, who you are, and what you've won. If you have an idea, people here want to hear it, but you damn well need to show some respect, and stuff like "The day you actually win any regatta or get to the olympics, you can start worrying about the weight in the end of the boom.
    Stop worrying so much about your equipment and start training." is not going to fly under any circumstances, not just against me, but against other people, you have no right to say anything like that to anyone, who do you think you are? Everyone here has the right to express their ideas and opinions under fair and easy going conditions, don't ruin it for everyone.
     
  17. stick

    stick Member

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    good job, the fire's out.
    have a good weekend, nothing to see here.
     
  18. viktor188924

    viktor188924 New Member

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    haha well this thread certaintly turned into a hellofa party while i was on the plane... good job guys... and dude, PUROLIO, come ON. Anyway, Sorry i was gone so long:
    Umm yeah thats what I use right now. It's pretty much the only other system possible if you want to take full use of the 7 turning points that are allowed, right? I dont think that rigging it this way would be any slower.

    Yeah I agree with your point that every bit helps... but I take apart all of my control lines everytime I derig anyway. I mean, being on a race team I kind of just rig with everyone else... nobody goes out until everyone's finished. However I do agree with you, but I'd love it if the newbs wouldn't be so slow at rigging. Then we'd get out quick.

    I'm not trying to criticize you, but do you actually think that weight there would actually affect anything? I mean, theoretically it would, theoretically everything you change on a boat would have some kind of affect... The way Ross rigs its not any more purchase... depending on whether you use a block with a becket vs a single block/no block. With standard rigging its either 9:1 or 6:1.

    Umm, wouldnt there be less line in the boat with more purchase?
    And that's what electrician's knots are for. Getting rid of excess line?
     
  19. LooserLu

    LooserLu LooserLu

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    This photo only let us see a part of the ful 8:1 power ratio system of the modern outhaul system.
    It has two controllines, all I can see at the photo.
    The secondary (red) controlline only is tied with a knot to the camcleat of the boom. For real, there are not 2 red lines, but one long.

    In 2004, drLaser invented 2 versions of a 8:1 outhaul system "that played with the devil's advocate", in reason it worked with a sort of "moving line" (for real it was part of the primary controlline) that went through the fairlead at the boom's end. There, a small HK 404 has been attached to the fairlead (also with the primary control line!!).
    Under the rules of 2004, this system has been legal, drLaser teached us very well, here at TLF.
    Unfortunately now, drLaser is being conspicuous by one's absence here at TLF and the rules did change in 2006 the wordings, related to the outhaul system.

    In moments like this, I hate that I'm only able to speak, to write and understand English like for runaways (...), sorry...
    We had several intensive discussions about outhaul systems in 2004 and 2005. Look there, for more infos.

    This system, as shown at the photo, seems to be legal in our days, if the primary controlline only turns one time through the fairlead at the end of the boom. But, the lines and the blocks, that are used at that boom, there at the photo, seem to have to much friction. I wouldn't use those ropes, but those drLaser did advised: 3mm Spectron 12 cordage for the primary pruchase and for the line, that has to move through the cleats at the deck: 4mm Spectron 12 cordage or Marlow's 4mm Excel Racing line. For the blocks of the secondary control line: Harken HK 351 (at the end of the first cascade) and 19mm Carbo Blocks of Ronstan Frederiksen for the other turning points of that line.

    Ciao
    LooserLu
     
  20. Deimos

    Deimos Member

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    On a two to one purchase, for every 6 ins of clew movement you pull 1 ft of line into the cockpit. On a 4 to 1 its 6ins clew movement for 2 ft line. On a 8 to 1 its 6ins clew movement giving you 4 ft on line in the cockpit. Its how purchases work !! (ignore the fact that my maths is embarrassing)


    Most people do not have time to stop and start tying fancy knots to tidy-up the line they have just pulled into the cockpit when tightening clew outhaul. Also, if you want to release it, you don't want to be messing around undoing some fancy knot you wasted time making when tightening the outhaul. When you need to tighten the outhaul, most people will pull on the line and leave that additional line taken in alone and ready to be released.


    Who taught you to sail ?


    Ian
     

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