New Sail, New Class, Laser Hull Rooster 8.1 Rig

Discussion in 'Laser Talk' started by Crooked Beat, Feb 24, 2007.

  1. knuckles

    knuckles New Member

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    I too am a fat boy. There a few Finns at my club, but I'm not about to drop the money to buy another boat. A Rooster big rig could be a fun toy for light days.

    But I am really interested in how this sail design works out. I remember the last time a sail trial was held last decade and went nowhere.
     
  2. 135569fgsc

    135569fgsc New Member

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    My mistake, the Rooster site does specify an aluminium lower section, I just assumed the carbon fibre top section lying on the deck of the 8.1 rigged boat was part of the 8.1 rig, too good to be true for the price I suppose.
     
  3. gouvernail

    gouvernail Active Member

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    In our local fleet there are at least ten guys who weigh over 220. We generaly don't take Laser racing very seriously because at 220 the boat simply does not perform as well as when the skipper weighs under 200.

    There are a ton of us who are way too big for Lasers and we have to sail other boats when we want to race seriously.

    The lack of a decent popular boat for big guys is the only reason big guys don't race in large numbers in singlehanded boats.

    Personally, I am glad the big rig concept is finally being floated out there.

    If the Rooster rig takes off. I am certain the builders will invent their own and make it the class legal builder supplied rig.
     
  4. LooserLu

    LooserLu LooserLu

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    Perhaps it has been one of the prototypes for the Laser Radial.

    In my opinion it would make sense to add this upper section, made of carbon, to such a rig in strong winds, because like for the Radial it allows to open the leech at the top of the Sail very effective. Perhaps this carbo upper mast section has been there, exact to discuss this aspect, I'm not sure.

    Does any one know, how the actual standing of tests are for the carbon upper mast of the Laser Radial? We didn't heard here something about it for months.

    P.S.: One point I have to correct at my reply somewhere above at this thread. I mentioned the mast step of the Byte, but for real, the mast step of the Megabyte has this reinforced HDPE-maststep-technology, sorry for not being exact in that point of discussion.

    Ciao
    LooserLu
     
  5. 49208

    49208 Tentmaker

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    Everything's bigger in Texas.
    [​IMG]
     
  6. rock steady

    rock steady New Member

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    Steve Cockerill's comments on Y&Y forum...

    http://www.yachtsandyachting.com/Forum/for...;PN=1&TPN=3

    "Great to hear the general positive feeling for the Rooster 8.1. I am sure it will not take sailors from the Phantom type fleets - but just might encourage some back to sailing with a grin on their face.

    I thought I should give you some background to the PY debate.

    In testing last week as Stokes Bay - I was pulling out 3 mins per lap in 4-5 knts. Each latp took about 20 mins. I took 3 mins out of the contender in the fist 30 mins. There was a huge windshift of the last beat - knocking my lead down to just 3 mins in 60 mins. But I was still grining.

    Further testing on Wednesday against a very competitive Laser sailor, Ian Morgan (actually the guy who had most to do with the Design) (he's Rooster's Latest Assett - so we are now officially a sailmaker too!) Anyway - in about 10 knts upwind The 8.1 was 5 secs faster in 3 mins - on a reach (I was picking the angle (cheat!)) the 8.1 was 15 secs faster in 3 mins and on a run - the 8.1 was 30 secs faster in 3 mins! Today in 20 knts, but wind with tide it was a bit harder work. Interestingly it was a quiet sail. No flappy flappy bit you get from the full rig - but at 79Kg and short enough to sail a radial - I would honestly say I was overpowered and found short taking up the shore in 20 knts and chop just a little physical. I guess I am glad really else it would be a direct competitor for a Laser style person. However, I pulled and passed lots of OCS sailors and finished moderately well in the fleet. The offwind legs were too short though (with the tide taking us down) I cruised past lots off wind - but gains downwind were reduced by the current upwind. I would have loved to see a 90Kg person upwind today! Everyone else who sailed the boat thought it was smoother than the standard rig, and were surprised at how well it handled. They did not want to give it back!

    I think the sail will work even better inland where the handicap should come into its own. I think we have been rather conservative with our Handicap on reflection.

    Some have said that the boat might not take the loads. We have said that it is for one person - and since the Laser is meant to be designed for up to two people (class rules permit) then one in an 8.1 should be fine. I have sailed lasers in 40 knts and pitch poled with two people in it! I do not think there is any real boat problems.

    We are open to a new rudder idea - we can definitely get a new blade made for the rudder stock - but I am keen to make the Rooster 8.1 class affordable - so we will make that development an option rather than a must have. Generally the rudder is more neutral than normal - although one sailor test sailed it today did not use enough Cunningham and he found the rudder heavy. We are also developing a carbon top mast - just a never break it type - that might lighten the rig slightly for downwind turns. Again - I have no intension of making it compulsory - and we definitely are keen to make them affordable.

    You can all get a chance to take a look at the 8.1 at the Ali Pali Dinghy Show. Rooster Sailing have two stands - the larger being C35 - just under the Rose Window. It is promising to be an interesting affair.

    Happy Sailing!"
     
  7. 1sailor

    1sailor Member

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    I like it. I weigh 200 and live in a light-air venue. We buzz off 100 races / year-- pretty good considering our short season-- and frequently have 'drifter' conditions.

    I'll order one up immediately if it becomes 'legit.' Somebody mentioned a carbon (illegal?) top section. what's the story on that ?
     
  8. Yiannis

    Yiannis New Member

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    Hi chaps,

    last weekend, here in London, we had the Dinghy Show last weeknd and the 8.1 rig was on display at the Rooster stand. No detailed photos I am afraid, but I can tell you it looks BIG!

    First time you see it, you think that the luff is wrong. It looks too baggy. We had to sheet-in and pull the kicker in order to get the sail flat. It looks good. I don't know if it will "take off" as a class, but I like the idea of having an alternative since I am over 100kg that's more than 200lb.

    I would like to say that the sail seems better than the Laser endorsed ones and the leech is Mylar which means that it will last twice as long. On top of that you can buy a better, bugger sail and a bigger bottom section for £350 GBP. Laser sell you a sail only for £420 GBP. This shows you the money they make.

    At the stand they had a top section, UNTESTED, made of carbon fibre. Now, they said that it was just a first prototype which hadn't been tested yet. So Steve Cockerill is working on a carbon top mast section, but it might take a while.
     
  9. 49208

    49208 Tentmaker

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    The dacron/mylar laminate in the leech with a dacron front end scares me a little bit from a long term shape issue. Any laminate with mylar is going to shrink over time, and this shrinkage is going to show up at the transition between the all dacron and the dacron/mylar laminate as some ugly vertical wrinkles. This usually shows up anywhere from 6 to 12 months after the sail has been in the customer's hands, more so if the sail is left in a hot climate, such as the inside of a car.

    Just something to be aware of down the road.
     
  10. HECS

    HECS New Member

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    Dividing up the fleet hasn't hurt the class too much here in Australia. The 04/05 and 05/06 national titles were the biggest ever, because now people less than 75kg or so can be competitive.

    Of interest, Brett Bayer was 194lb the first regatta I raced him in, and in light/moderate winds he beat Michael Blackburn overall. He didn't feel that being nearly 200lb really hurt him much at all.
     
  11. Georg W.F.

    Georg W.F. Member

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    I guess that the idea is that the shrinking material + the stretching of the leech equals zero. The main reason for a laser sail losing its shape is the stretching of the leech. This construction tries to eliminate that.
    If it works: time will tell.

    G
     
  12. lasersailpete

    lasersailpete New Member

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    the rooster 8.1 rules my laser feels like it did 15 years ago when i was 20 kgs lighter love it ! thank you rooster.
     
  13. GBR 134

    GBR 134 Member

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