New owner - are hiking straps a must?

Discussion in 'Capri/Catalina 14 Talk' started by sailor9073, Aug 13, 2013.

  1. sailor9073

    sailor9073 New Member

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    I owned a Catalina 22 for 8 years but have been out of sailing for at least that long. After retiring recently I wanted to find a smaller, simpler sailboat and bought a Capri 14.2. It doesn't have hiking straps and I haven't been too concerned since, at 66, I don't plan to push the boat to the limits especially while learning.

    I could singlehand my C22 with comfort and ease, but after reading post here I'm concerned about how easy C14.2 capsizes. Do I really need hiking straps right now in order to maintain control of this boat. Should I have a Bob installed? Hate to keep adding costs if not necessary until next year's full sailing season.
     
  2. gregwcoats

    gregwcoats Member

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    I am also 66 years old, and for that reason I have installed hiking straps, Baby Bob and a boarding ladder. I have sailed my 14.2 for 4 years now, mostly solo, and have been "on the edge" a few times, but never capsized (yet). I put my feet under the straps most of the time, and therefore am able to lean out to keep control of the boat. I also use a tiller extender when hiked out. Make it a habit to cleat the sails only when you have to. If you end up healed over to the point of a capsize, the main cleat will be at an angle that it cannot be released. BTW, I started with a Catalina 22, moved up to a 27 then a 30, and have more fun "sailing" in my 14 than I ever did in the other three. If you live in Southern California maybe we could get together sometime and sail.
     
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  3. sailor9073

    sailor9073 New Member

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    Thanks for the quick reply and the tips, Greg. Looks like I'd better round up hiking straps now instead of next year. My sailing season is much shorter than yours. I'd enjoy sailing with you, but I live in Indiana. One of my brothers lives in Laguna Beach, so there's always a chance if I visit him.

    I've worked on getting the boat back in shape since buying it a couple of weeks ago. My son-in-law is going to meet me at the marina today to help step the mast so I can finally get the boat in the water. I'll just have to be very careful until I get the hiking straps.

    Do you step the mast by yourself? I've seen several posts about this but haven't had time to experiment yet.

    Larry Grubbs
    Hull #2031
    Swee' Pea (name is a long story...C22 was named Popeye)
     
  4. Steve Rose

    Steve Rose Member

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    I think that the need for straps and bobs is very dependent on the conditions that you find typically in your location. In Minnesota, wind speed and direction are quite variable; some days when we plan to sail, there is either too little or too much wind. I like the straps, and I am looking for an economical way to make a bob, possibly one that can go up and down with the main sail, so that I can use it as needed.
     
  5. gregwcoats

    gregwcoats Member

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    Yes I step the mast solo, I attach the top of the forstay to its bracket two thirds of the way up the mast then I tie the mail halyard end off to the front of the trailer, then after attaching the side stays, I attach the base of the mast to the mounting bracket and then raise the mast while standing behind it, then while pushing against the mast with my shoulder I pull the loose end of the main halyard tight and cleat it at the base of the mast. The mast is now free standing and is secured in three places, the two side stays and the main halyard which is still tied off to the trailer, I then climb off the boat and attach the bottom of the forstay, or in my case the bottom of the roller furling, to its mount on the bow of the boat. The main halyard now can be uncleated from the base of the mast and also from the trailer. Note: the boat is still secured to the trailer with the straps that hold it down to the trailer while I am aboard the boat doing this, I do not remove the tiedown straps until just before backing the trailer into the water.
     
  6. gregwcoats

    gregwcoats Member

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    I have seen others tie a one gallon milk jug, with the cap glued on, to the top of the mast. I should work, but looks like heck.
     
  7. Gene Reed

    Gene Reed New Member

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    I'm 67 and spending my first summer with a 14.2. My "other boat" is a Catalina 27. While hiking straps make a difference, I think it's really the ability of the sailor to shift sides and move where needed in the boat. I've gone over several times, even stuck the mast in the mud once (don't bother putting a wind indicator on the masthead - it breaks off) because I got caught on the lee side on a tack going around a windward mark. Most other dinghy racers who have sailed the boat say it is a bit tender. Agility and anticipation come before hardware in my opinion. But get the straps - it's cool to hike out when you get it right.
     
  8. sailor9073

    sailor9073 New Member

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    I finally ordered the hiking straps, but I'm not sure how to attach them. I've tried searching the internet for information about how the straps attach and can't find anything. The loops on the two forward straps must attach to the bails on the barney post. There are two small stainless steel plates screwed in under the cuddy, and I think that's where the other (flat) ends of the straps attach. The flat part of the rear strap goes into a "buckle" attached to the transom, but I don't see where the looped end of the strap would attach to the barney post. Am I missing a piece of hardware?
     
  9. Steve Rose

    Steve Rose Member

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    This photo shows the hardware used to connect the straps to the barney post. capri barneypost.jpg
     
  10. Misterranger

    Misterranger New Member

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    What is the name of the hardware shown in the picture. I'm missing one and would like to replace it but have no idea what it's called. "D ring" does not show me the right hardware.

    Thanks
     
  11. Steve Rose

    Steve Rose Member

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  12. Steve Rose

    Steve Rose Member

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    At the end of the thread I linked below, I show how I implemented a Hobie Bob on my 14.2; no drilling of the mast is required.

    http://sailingforums.com/threads/de-masted-in-mission-bay-2013.29376/page-2
     
  13. boat

    boat Member

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    Hi Larry,


    Congratulations on becoming a 14.2 owner; I think you will like it. I have not owned a 14.2 for a long time but I have sailed numerous dinghies and I must say that I find the 14.2 just a bit tender (very tender as compared to the Feeling 58…). Actually I find the 14.2 very responsive and easy to sail – excellent for teaching kids to sail. The new sailor (kids) will find it a challenge to keep the big stick pointing basically upward when the wind gets up a bit or the gusts set in. However, what they learn on the 14.2 is totally transferable to two or three sail sloops. I raced the 22 for a few years and find it to be much more stable. You will find that it is far more of a challenge than your 22 when winds that exceed 8 knots – still very manageable but more balance is needed.


    I step the mast single handed with no difficulties of concerns. With the shrouds attached and the foot of the mast nailed down simply walk the mast up while keeping the head stay in hand. If it is windy you may want to attach the jib halyard to the front of the boat and use it as a safety line – not necessary but it may make you feel more comfortable.


    I have and use the hiking straps. I am only 78 years old so I still push the boat to its limits as best I can. I find it necessary to use the straps in strong or gusty winds. I feel they make the difference between sailing on or pausing for a refreshing dip in the water after a big gust.


    I have defiantly gone center board up more than once. I have my mast sealed so it doesn’t take on water when submerged. Normally it will come upright pretty easy if you get to the keel/centerboard quickly. If you dilly dally around it could become more difficult. I do not have buoyance mounted on my masthead. The only time I needed additional flotation on the mast to get it up out of the mud I used a couple of my extra life vests. It took a little work but I gotter done. I swam under the boat into the cockpit where there was plenty of air. I loosened the jib halyard and then pulled the jib up (up to the deck level) where I removed the jib halyard from the sail and tied it to the live preservers. Back into the cockpit I pulled the vests to the mast head and waited for results. In about a minute or less the mast came floating to the surface after which I got on the center board and the boat popped upright just as advertised. I do not know why people have difficulty unless their mast leaks and tales on water. I can’t say for sure but that is my thinking. I basically took the same steps when turtling the Hobby 16 and never had an issue with up righting the boat.


    Oh yes; I am often asked which boat I most enjoyed racing. This is an easy one – the Albin Baled. This is a 30 foot Swedish boat designed for the North Atlantic and all of its fury. The boat was tough as nails and did fairly well in racing inland as well as the open water racing.


    Good luck – let us know how you do in the 14.2


    Jim
     

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