My first capsize

Discussion in 'Laser Talk' started by per_nulla, Sep 27, 2016.

  1. per_nulla

    per_nulla New Member

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    Well, it happened. Even though there was a very slight breeze I decided to go out anyway. Some practice is better than no practice, sort of thing. I was just sailing along the lake tacking my way east towards the dam, watching a few others behind me, watching their sails to see if I were on the right track. Most of the time I was sitting perpendicular to the boat with my legs crossed on the deck, one hand on the tiller/extension and the other (when not cleated) on the main sheet. Every once in a while a gust would pick up and force me to sit up a little to adjust. One of those gusts started small finished off with a big puff then died. Before I knew it the sail was submerged and I was standing straight up on the side of wall of the cockpit. So, for the first time I got to practice righting a Laser. So far it's been an adventure each time out.
     
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  2. cskudder

    cskudder Active Member

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    Glad you're enjoying it! Just to offer a little perspective: I've been sailing for 50+ years, and have sailed a Laser for 25 or more of that. I happened to be out myself today in a big wind, 20 mph gusting to maybe 30 - loads of fun. I had not capsized in like 2 years, so before I came in, I deliberately "dumped it." I did that for a couple reasons - I wanted to test my drysuit and make sure it was ready for winter; and having NOT capsized for too long, I wanted to right it again in big wind and waves (which takes a bit more doing than tamer conditions), and before the water gets really cold, which complicates things a bit further, even WITH a drysuit.

    So I think it's a good thing that you went over + got it back up. My experience, even after sailing for all these years, is that the boat just goes over from time to time. In some way, if it's not going over at least every once in a while, maybe I'm missing out on some fun sailing along the way. And often enuf it goes over at a time that I would not have anticipated. It's good to be well-practiced in righting the boat because it will just go over sometimes.

    Hope you keep at it + keep having fun.
     
  3. per_nulla

    per_nulla New Member

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    Oh I am. Sometimes I feel a little silly. I'm in my mid 50s and get excited (almost giddy) when I get to go out. When things get a little hairy I'm like Major "King" Kong ridin' the nuke; but without the tragic consequences :eek:
     
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  4. cskudder

    cskudder Active Member

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    As it should be, and maybe feel blessed instead of / in addition to silly.

    I often say that sailing an old Laser "just for fun + just cuz I can" is the most fun per hour and per dollar of anything I know. Try your hand at racing if that sounds interesting, but not required. Except for lightning, cold water, and perhaps an off-shore wind out to open water, it's a pretty safe, cheap + easy way to get big wide grin's. Go for it.
     
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  5. per_nulla

    per_nulla New Member

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    I do feel very blessed. The lake is less than 20 miles a way and I can make my own hours at work. I'll be going this afternoon. I've got an email into the the two local clubs about adding me to their event notification list. I hope to enter a few races for fun and experience. I'll probably make my way to the SF bay area for a few.
     
  6. Eyeper

    Eyeper Member

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    Hey, if you do ever make it to the Bay Area, post ahead here and I'd be delighted to have you come sail with me and a couple other Laser sailors on Tomales Bay - one of the greatest Laser spots on Earth. Steady, mostly straight-line winds and uncrowded gorgeous scenery.
     
  7. per_nulla

    per_nulla New Member

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    Thanks and I will take you up on that. It'll probably be a trip just for that reason. :D On the way out to the light house, my wife and I drove through the Inverness Yacht club parking a lot back in July. There was a group at the end of the pier getting ready to go out and few already out. I told my wife that would be a great place to sail.
     
  8. andyatos

    andyatos Active Member

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    You definitely want to take Dennis up on his offer. I've sailed with Dennis on several occasions and he knows Tomales Bay quite well.

    Even on days where there really isn't a northwest wind forecast (the usual, best wind direction for Tomales Bay), the area still produces wind. Here's a video from a day where a light southwest wind was produced simply from the fog pouring over the Point Reyes crest and down onto Tomales Bay. It allowed myself and my protege Greg... who was pretty new to sailing at the time... to sail straight down the bay without having to tack.

    This allowed us to sail 5 miles to the northwest to Hog Island. We then pulled up on a beach on Point Reyes for a break then returned to our launch point, running pretty much the whole way using a light northwest wind that had developed on the northeast side of the bay. On other more typical northwest wind days, it's completely clear and... simply spectacular.

    Cheers,

    - Andy
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2016
  9. per_nulla

    per_nulla New Member

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    Andy, Great vid. Since I'm so new to this I find it interesting the nuanced differences in rigging sailors will use. I really like the paddle. After having to remove the tiller extension to use as a paddle I bought a cheapo telescoping one from Big 5. Thanks
     
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  10. Eyeper

    Eyeper Member

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    I carried a paddle for the first few years - and one could come in handy on a fluky lake - but I have never had to have one on Tomales Bay. Here is a typical example of the nice breeze there:

     
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  11. per_nulla

    per_nulla New Member

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    Eyeper, what gloves, shoes, wetsuit and top are you wearing? The skin on the inside of my thumbs are wear thin but I'm concern that gloves will slide around on my hands during transitions. My 2mm shorty is great when it's in the mid 70s but winter is just around the corner. Also, I want to get a long sleeve top but I think neoprene may be restrictive. Right now I'm wearing a pair of cheapo, unsupportive neoprene boots. Basically, I'm using what I have on hand until I know what to use/buy. Any input would be helpful.
     
  12. andyatos

    andyatos Active Member

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    I have sailing gloves similar to these. I don't have any issues with them sliding around on my hands.

    - Andy
     
  13. andyatos

    andyatos Active Member

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    Yes, every now and then you get "glassed" where the wind dies off completely and you need to paddle. Here's a video from last winter where the forecast was pretty much for no wind but we wanted to sail. The paddling begins at 4 minutes, 15 seconds.

    As you were inquiring about wetsuit and clothing combos, notice what Greg is wearing. His 3/2 mill full length wetsuit with a windbreaker over that. This day was pretty darn cold (January 2016)... even though the winds were light and it was sunny. But Greg said he was quite comfortable.

    - Andy
     
  14. Eyeper

    Eyeper Member

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    Dennis here, again.

    I've tried a lot of wetsuits over the years, but my current favorite is a full-length 2/3mm O'Neill. One extra chilly-windy days I wear a light windbreaker top over it, and hardly ever have to resort to the heavier full winter wetsuits. Certain summer days I go with a light "Shorty" short sleeve and legs suit, but I almost always prefer the longer suits and they provide extra protection against cuts and bruises while banging around on tacks & gybes. Gloves? I've never found a "sailing glove" with the same fantastic grip as the "Atlas Garden glove," which is about 7-8 bucks at the hardware store. I just scissor off the tips of the thumbs and first two fingers so I still have ability to tie or untie knots. My boots are Aigle, but they don't make 'em any more. I hear a lot of other skiff sailors give good reports on Gils. It is really handy to have boots with enough sturdy sole on the in case you have to walk over rocks.
     
  15. per_nulla

    per_nulla New Member

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    I just got back from the lake. Lesson learned from the last time out. I can't get compliant with this little boat. Today started off with almost no wind at all. As soon as I got a little ways out the wind picked up. This time I was ready for it. My stern foot was always on the opposite side of the hiking strap. The wind so unpredictable (to my novice ability) I had to be ready to switch sides every moment. As soon as the sail filled and the boat started going over I was already making my adjustments. I was able to practice sailing through a narrow passage between an island and the shore. I tried to post the vid of the path Garmin gave me but it didn't work. So I attached a snap shot. I went up to the left a bit, down to the right, into the "Gulch" area, traversed the narrow passage, straight up, around the island then back in. I know it's not a big deal but the wind was swirling around so it was to me lol.
     

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