Mast Cleat Installation

Discussion in 'Sunfish Talk' started by Wally, Apr 26, 2011.

  1. Wally

    Wally New Member

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    I want to install a mast cleat. Are there any opinions as to the best location? I also have two options - 1.) Drill and tap the 3" plastic cleat with SS bolts or 2.) Use self tapping screws. Any opinions?

    Thanks,
    Wally
     
  2. minas man

    minas man Member

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    Wally I used self tapping stainless screws with lock-tite or chalking on the threads. The first mast that I did I was just below the 48 inch mark and on my next mast I mounted it at a lower height, sorry the boat is still in its winter cocoon so I can't get the exact measurement now. Cleat is mounted on the starboard side of mast and is lined up below the mast head fair-lead so halyard runs straight up the mast. Here is a link.
    http://www.sunfishclass.org/tips/cleats.gif

    ><> Minas man <><
     
  3. ylojelo

    ylojelo Member

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    so you skip the deck mounted pulley altogether? I just read this for the first time in another thread. Why is this better and what keeps the mast in place if you capsize?
     
  4. Wavedancer

    Wavedancer Upside down? Staff Member

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    Please read the posts by Wavedancer and Minas Man in the other thread for clarification.

     
  5. rhr@cebridge.net

    rhr@cebridge.net Member

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    I was thinking aluminum pop rivets would hold just fine. I've heard mixing stainless with aluminum sets off some kind of reaction that over time ruins the integrity of the mechanical attachment.
     
  6. minas man

    minas man Member

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    Yes it is best not to mix metals on a boat because of galvanic action which means that the two types of metal act like a battery and one will loose electrons to another especialy when combind with water, we call it corrosion. That is why you try to keep the mixing of metals to a minimun and use lock-tite or chaulking between metals and rince off all salt water with fresh water and keep boat dry when not in use.
    The new style aluminum Sunfish rudder has a mix of metals stainless and aluminum and the one part that they disigned to be the anode, or to get eating away, is the spring pin that goes through the rudder as it is easy to replace and inexpensive.
    All boats have to manage there metals because you can not help mixing them as some parts have to be stronger and some lighter. I wanted the strength of stainless to hold that halyard cleat but maybe aluminum rivots will work.

    ><> Minas man <><
     
  7. winever

    winever Member

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    To keep the mast attached to the hull during a capsize, simply lead the halyard (after tying off at the cleat) thru the bullseye and tie off at the deck cleat. Or you can go thru the eye, then over the gooseneck for a vang effect, back down thru the eye and then to the deck cleat.

    Win ever.
     
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  8. tag

    tag my2fish

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    that is exactly the way I have been doing it. I just installed the mast cleat last summer - I used the blue masking tape to mark off the 48″ limit per the Sunfish class. I used the 3M 4200 sealant behind the cleat, and fastened it on with #10 stainless steel sheet metal screws – I had to pre-drill the mast with small pilot holes.

    [​IMG]

    cheers,
    tag
     
  9. tag

    tag my2fish

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  10. squash

    squash Member

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    Several people mentioned rivets, but no one replied about their use. To me, they would seem to be the best choice. They give an aluminum/aluminum connection and wouldn't they be stronger than screw threads?
     
  11. minas man

    minas man Member

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    Most of my sailing is in done in extreme tidal conditions where equipment failure can have serious consequences so I try to use what I believe is the best fastener for the job and in this case fastening a cleat to a mast stainless steel screws were my choice. Very strong, able to tighten or remove in the field with only a screwdriver. When rivets fail they have to be replaced.

    ><> Minas man <><
     
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  12. fbjru

    fbjru Member

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    I've used self tapping screws on two of mine. Three years and no problems.
     
  13. winever

    winever Member

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    BTW, a couple of things to add, the 4 feet class limit on cleat height is from the end of the aluminum pole, not the deck. Saw a guy this weekend that made that mistake and corrected it. Also be sure you mount it "high enough" because if you adjust the tie on the upper spar for deck clearance on the lower spar it will change how far up the mast the gooseneck can travel. I first mounted too low and the cleat prevented the gooseneck from raising to the correct height. So much to learn on such a simple boat, LOL. Cheers, Winever.
     
  14. squash

    squash Member

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    I just ordered a mast-cleat from APS and they sent me an aluminum one made by LaserPerformance. I noticed that the horn-cleat on the deck appears to be made of plastic.

    Is the heavier, aluminum cleat okay to use on the mast, or should I send it back and get a plastic one?
     
  15. minas man

    minas man Member

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    This is your call as plastic or aluminum will do the job. My cleat is 5 inch nylon plastic because that is what was is stock at a local Wal-mart for under $5. The weight difference would not be much but more important for me is how rounded the cleat is so it does not catch on the sail. Mine is mounted 39.5 inches to center of cleat from the bottom of the mast which is lower than the first one that I installed.

    ><> Minas man <><
     

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  16. powergroove

    powergroove Member

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    Advantages: Youre not trying to pull your mast thru the mast step tube with your halyard, then run your downhaul to keep the mast with the boat for capsize.
     
  17. squash

    squash Member

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    "When you have a lot of things to do, it's best to get your nap out of the way first."

    I live by these words.
     

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