Jib Halyard question

Discussion in 'Capri/Catalina 14 Talk' started by c14_Lance, Jul 28, 2011.

  1. c14_Lance

    c14_Lance New Member

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    I recently purchased a Capri 14.2, sail number 995.
    The Jib halyard is one line. I noticed in the manual that it should be rigged differently, using two lines and a block on the port side of the mast.
    any suggestions on which one I should use?
    Thanks
     
  2. gregwcoats

    gregwcoats Member

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    In the manual it may look like two lines, but it is one line running from the top of the jib, up through the block at the mast and then back down to the bottom of the mast where it is cleated off. I have roller furling, but that is how I remember it.
     
  3. c14_Lance

    c14_Lance New Member

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    Thanks Greg!
    I was reading the rigging diagram incorrectly.
     
  4. spoons

    spoons New Member

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    I think it is two lines in the rigging diagram: one line attaches to the head of the jib, runs through the block near the top of the mast, then down and dead-ends to a block with becket. The other line is dead-ended at the other end of the block, runs through the middle of the cleat, up through the block, then through the jam cleat. This provides 3:1 purchase.

    I just use one line. I suppose the 3:1 purchase is good in high winds when you want to flatten the sail.
     
  5. c14_Lance

    c14_Lance New Member

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    Thanks Spoons,
    I guess it is a matter of preference then, and what your wind conditions are. I was thinking of trying the rigging as I read it in the diagram. If I don't like it I can always go back to the single line.
    Thanks again for your reply,
    Lance
     
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  6. Allatoona

    Allatoona Member

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    I found a picture of how I have my jib halyard configured, hopefully this is what you are looking for. The halyard comes down, I tied a small block in a loop in the halyard, the remaining line continues down to the cleat. I run the halyard through the inside of the cleat and back up through the block then back down to the cleat.

    This allows me to get the jib/forestay very tight. Which allows the boat to point better upwind. Before I did this, I had a very difficult time sailing upwind in heavy winds.

    -Robert
    1989 Capri 14.2
    1984 Catalina 22
     
  7. c14_Lance

    c14_Lance New Member

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    Thanks Robert,
    I am going to try rigging it like that. I get some pretty good winds here on the lake so I think it will help me flatten out the jib.
    Lance
     
  8. chemprof

    chemprof Member

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    The reason for the becket block isn't really just to have more purchase on the jib halyard. If you rig it right, it will allow you to adjust the jib halyard tension very quickly as needed under different angles of attack and wind speed.

    Run the halyard down to the becket block, becket down, and tie the halyard to the top of the block. Now attach a second halyard length to the becket and cleat this halyard to the port cleat so that the fore stay is still taut.

    Run the end of the cleated halyard back up and through the block, then run the halyard down to cleat it at the port clam cleat.

    Now, in high wind you can easily and quickly flatten the jib by pulling on the halyard at the clam cleat, thus making adjustments on the fly. It is just as easy to loosen the halyard tension as you make your downwind run.

    Another advantage to having the rigging this way is that having two lengths of jib halyard allows you to have two different lines. For example, I have 15 feet of Vectrus 12 (1/8") on the upper part using a micro block at the mast tang. Since the Vectrus doesn't cleat well in a clam cleat, my lower jib halyard is 15 feet of Crystalyne (3/16").
     
  9. c14_Lance

    c14_Lance New Member

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    Jib Halyard

    Thanks for the reply guys! I just want to be sure I am seeing this right:
    So you use two lines at about 15ft each. That means that when you drop the jib the block will actually go up to about the height of the jib block up on the mast. Every time I raise the jib I will need to rig the block then run it thru the jam cleat, am I right?
    Lance
     
  10. chemprof

    chemprof Member

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    It could! But, no, I usually bring the block down to about a foot or so above the starboard cleat, then continue the jib halyard around the cleat (don't bother to cleat it yet) and back up through the block, then back down to cleat it on the same starboard cleat (not the clam cleat). Just don't let go of either end (as you no doubt know)!

    No! I leave the block tied into the "double" halyard at its middle. It essentially is permanently tied at the middle of the 30 foot halyard.

    To make ready, I simply uncleat the halyard (which was cleated as described above), attach the jib as normally done, haul the jib up and apply rather loose tension, cleat as you would normally, but pass the bitter end of the halyard up thru the block, then back down thru the clam cleat, where I'll set tension until the forestay goes slack.

    I realize a picture is worth a thousand words, but my boat is in the slip. Check the handbook (link up a the top of the C14 Forum masthead) for a fairly decent drawing).

    -- Edward
     
  11. c14_Lance

    c14_Lance New Member

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    Jib Halyard

    Thanks Ed,
    Yes, that's the way I have it rigged. I'm going to give it a try this weekend and see how it works for me.
    Thanks again to everyone for the input!
    Lance
     
  12. c14_Jim

    c14_Jim Sailing on Shelter Bay

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    Lido 14 rig

    I had a couple of Lido 14's and raced them. They have a block on the bottom of the halyard about 2 feet off the deck and then a line through that so you have a 2 to one advantage. It allows for fine tuning the jib luff tension which, it turns out, is critical to the Lido. On my Omega I simply have a single line to a cleat and I never adjust it while racing (even though I probably should).
     

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