Install inspection port(s)???

Discussion in 'Sunfish Talk' started by hiltonfh, Jul 1, 2007.

  1. hiltonfh

    hiltonfh New Member

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    I have a 1976 Sunfish and was wondering if I should install inspection ports, what size, how many and where? Any direction would be helpful. After sailing the boat 3 times in a week I could hear a little water in the hull.

    Thanks in advance :D
     
  2. Alan Glos

    Alan Glos Active Member

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    I usually install a 6" diameter port centered between the "V" of the splashrail and the forward end of the daggerboard trunk and a smaller port (5" dia.) on the after deck centered under the tiller about 2" forward if the edge of the deck. With both ports open, you can get a good flow of air and keep the inside of the hull nice and dry.

    Alan Glos
    Cazenovia, NY
     
  3. DanB

    DanB Crabber

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    I don't entirely agree with installing two ports unless you are drying out water logged flotation. One port should suffice for general upkeep ventilation. Try first opening the deck drain, tipping up the stern, rolling the boat so the starboard side is down, let the boat down to rest on its side, and drain out the water. This should be done after every time out. And when you find water draining from the hull, you need to fix the leak not just band-aid the result.
     
  4. nate95366

    nate95366 New Member

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    Although I would affirm the ideal of finding the leaks and fixing them, when you sail a 1976 hull (I sail a '74), there's going to be more than a few leaky spots down there.

    I spend some time at the outset of each season leak-hunting and repairing, but it still seems that by season's end, I have a significant amount of water inside the hull. I know that when I installed an inspection port (just aft of splashrail), it made drying the boat out a lot easier.

    Nate
     
  5. nate95366

    nate95366 New Member

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    From my experience (I sail a '74 hull), the older hulls have a number of leaks, so that you could spend all your time repairing your hull, and then go out and still take on some water while you sail. I try to catch the biggest offenders during each off-season, but when it's warm I like to sail. I know that adding an inspection port up between the centerboard trunk and the splashrail gives me access to the "low spot" in the hull where water will collect so that I can sponge it out and also is a big help in those off-season repairs.

    Nate
     
  6. hiltonfh

    hiltonfh New Member

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    Thanks a bunch for all the input. I think I will start with one port between the splash rail and dagger board trunk. The boat was light when I bought it and I want to keep it that way.

    Dan mentioned opening the "deck drain". Is this the drain in the cockpit? It is the only one I know the boat to have.

    Thanks for the responses!!!!!;)
     
  7. mike4947

    mike4947 Member

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    There is a small metal or plastic, depending on the age of the boat, on the edge of the deck. That if the boat is turned up on edge will be at the low point to drain watr from the hull.
    I also agree with starting with a single port. The location in front of the daggerboard coinsides with the low point in the hull when the boat is level/floating on the water and any water will collect there to be sponged out.
    I added the rear port mainly as the beach where the boat is stored is fairly steep and any water in the hull migrates to the rear of the boat and the back port allows me to easy access to sponge it out after sailing.
     
  8. Wayne

    Wayne Member Emeritus

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    This may help
     

    Attached Files:

  9. hiltonfh

    hiltonfh New Member

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    Great! I was wondering what that was for :rolleyes:
     
  10. DanB

    DanB Crabber

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    I dunno That sure hasn’t been my experience with half a dozen 20 or more years old hollow hull boats over the decades and four of them Sunfish. A thorough leak fix in the beginning and I get five or six years between new seeps. Even then I know why since they are usually the result of me grounding the dagger board or other abuse. If you beach carefully and don’t have kids jumping on the deck while it’s parked in the yard and don’t bounce it down rocky paths on a suppository dolly and don’t just do quickie bubble gum wad in the hole putty patch jobs IMHO the hull should stay solid and dry for many years.
     
  11. Wavedancer

    Wavedancer Upside down? Staff Member

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    Moreover, it's likely you can fix a number of problems in one session if you plan the repairs.
     
  12. hiltonfh

    hiltonfh New Member

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    Looking in the dagger board sleeve I can see the criss cross pattern of the fiberglass fabric. Will this cause the boat to leak or is this still waterproof? How do I fix it if it is a problem? I read somewhere to line the front and rear of the sleeve with green grass carpet. Anyone heard this?

    Thanks again in advance!!!:)
     
  13. Ninja_sailer

    Ninja_sailer New Member

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    I just bought a 76 AMF sunfish 3 days ago and I know my boat needs dried out. I want to add an inspection port but I don't knwo wehre to get the parts. Is there an inspection port kit I can buy somewhere. ALso, can I use any calk to seal it, or is there a good brand?
     
  14. DanB

    DanB Crabber

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  15. DanB

    DanB Crabber

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    The slot isn't a cosmetic area and doesn't always get lots of gel coat. Visible fiberglass isn't always a sign of a leak. You have to leak test to be sure. Don't just guess.
    I don't know if Green Grass carpet is something magical. Indoors&Outdoors carpet is sometimes used to snug up the slot, but that has nothing to do with leak fixing.
     

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