Improvement Pictures #1

Discussion in 'Capri/Catalina 14 Talk' started by c14_Scott, Jul 15, 2008.

  1. c14_Scott

    c14_Scott New Member

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    In another post, someone was nice enough to ask for pictures of the improvements I have made to my new-to-me 1990 14.2.

    Needing to launch from public ramps with limited room, a motor was essential. Here are a couple of shots of the Honda BF-2. I've been out twice now and it's a spectacular motor - moves the boat along very nicely & the bracket keeps it away from the traveler:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    ... one of the many great recommendations found here was the addition of a Boom Kicker to hold up the boom when the sail is down:

    [​IMG]

    ... and of course the one I hope to never use, the highly-recommended mast float:

    [​IMG]

    ... the bracket is made from 1/8" aluminum strap purchased at Lowe's. Being 22' in the air and out-of-sight, I opted to make it strong at the sacrifice of appearance.

    I've tried several times to post this unsuccessfully... perhaps I exceeded some maximum message size. I have another modification that I'll post separately.
     
  2. JGM

    JGM Member

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    Hi Scott,
    I'm looking at your great pictures and I see a couple more improvements you might consider.

    The first is put a loop in the center of your traveler instead of the current arrangement where the traveler block is allowed to "travel" side to side. By fixing the sheet to the center of the traveler (effectively converting the traveler into a bridle), you can point significantly higher when sailing to windward. You can either tie the traveler around the existing block or go on to suggestion #2 where....

    You ditch the traveler block altogether and single line it from the boom down to the loop in the traveler. Disconnect the end of the main from the becket on the boom block and tie it directly to the loop, or you could attach a snap to the main for quickly detaching (what I did). This doubles the responsiveness of the main sheet and allows you to seriously shorten the main, removing lots of loose line from the cockpit floor when sailing upwind. The downside comes in heavy wind when you want to pull in the main and it takes twice as much force. So far this hasn't bothered me yet, and I like the modification.

    Hope this helps,
    Jim
     
  3. SHNOOL

    SHNOOL Member

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    Lazy man's traveler stops.

    Scott, I took the lazy mans approach to what JGM suggests... I took electrical tape, and marked out 3 inches in either side of center on the traveler... I wrapped the tape around several times, making the line too thick at that point to allow the block to pass over it. This was a temporary tweak really to see how well it worked. It allows more side to side than what JGM suggests, but it definitely points higher now. I may decrease that distance some later on... and the beauty is, I can remove the tape anytime, and do just that, until I get a setting I like.

    JGM is definitely right though, she points like a scowl without doing something to get that boom closer to center.

    I saw a suggestion on another part of this forum, to put knots in the line, as well... This is a cheap/simple option too.

    I may later on, either A) change the tape to rigging tape - duh - didn't want to waste that $$$ tape for a "test" or B) put a loop in it as JGM suggests. I do, however, want that aft block purchase to remain, as I am generally lazy and like the light pull in heavier winds :) .
     
  4. c14_Scott

    c14_Scott New Member

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    Thanks for the tip! I just went out and tied a section of line across the traveler block so it couldn't move.

    But please educate me... if it's so much better to not have movement on that connection, what is the purpose of the traveler in the first place?

    I've seen this tip elsewhere but if it's so much better, why do boats have a traveler at all?

    One of the reasons I got this boat was to learn... Thanks!
     
  5. SHNOOL

    SHNOOL Member

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    A "real" traveler would be linear, or slightly bowed... It would allow you to pull the center to windward, even past centerline (not that you'd want to do that, except going backwards)... See the Catalina Capri 22 (attached pict). This would be an IDEAL traveler. You'd cinch the sheet in tight, and adjust the angle of the main depending on how "close" you were to the wind. This would keep the main's shape ideal for all points, where you would likely only ease out the sheet going broad, or direct downwind.

    This is really an attempt at making a workable traveler... on a trailer sailboat. Frankly it is better than some arrangements. Even the Capri 22, although it is great for sailing, it is lousy for where it is, I mean, talk about an ankle buster! Whereas look where the Catalina 22 puts it (on the stern), now you cannot lift the tiller much.

    Truth be told, on most smaller boats, it is a matter of compromise. I am not sure why (since the barney post is already in the way), they didn't just put a full fledged traveler there (like the 22), and ankles be darned. I mean, look at that centerboard config, it isn't like they cared about those ankles anyway! Too funny.

    Either way an ideal traveler would allow you to adjust the port/starboard of your boom, and the sheet would adjust the tension/distance. But the default config, keeps the boom easily off centerline by 12 inches, keeping our nice little capri from pointing as close as she really can!
     

    Attached Files:

  6. fan

    fan Member

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    Hi Scott,
    Nice pictures and good mods to your boat. Regarding the traveler, Catalina's original design is just not that good for the boat to sail well up wind. The boom always ends up too far below the center line of the boat and when you sheet too hard the leech just closes off, stalling the flow. So by stopping off the traveler in the middle you bring the boom closer to the center of the boat. If you lengthen the traveler to 28" apex off the top of the transom instead of the 10 to 12 inches it looks like now, you will also get much better point upwind. This extra traveler hight allows the main to be trimmed to centerline without closing of the leech making for better air flow accross the whole sail.
     
  7. JGM

    JGM Member

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    I've had boats with both setups - a bridle or a traveler bar similar to the rope traveler on the C-14. Still... I had to look this one up. As it turns out, having an adjustable traveler would be the ideal setup. When the winds are light to moderate, you lock it to the center which accentuates the power on the luff of the mainsail. However, if the winds get frisky, it's best to slide the traveler leeward (the original Catalina setup). This transfers the accentuation to the leech of the sail to help maintain control and power in lieu of reefing.

    In other words, undo the line choking the traveler block in high winds and restrict it to the center for milder wind speeds.

    At least that what it says in the Annapolis Book of Seamanship by John Rousmaniere. :confused: :confused: :confused:

    And fan is correct. The top of the loop in the traveler should be around 28" above the stern, or as high as you can make it without hitting the becket block on the end of the boom. This keeps the boom more centered than having the main sheet anchored closer to the deck.

    Hope this helps,
    Jim
     
  8. fan

    fan Member

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    A continuos Traveler to mainsheet setup would be the best. Snipes use this setup and it is very cool but not class legal for the C14.2. If you're not racing one design, thats the way to go.
     
  9. goodsteel53

    goodsteel53 New Member

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    Any place to look at this arrangement?
     
  10. fan

    fan Member

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  11. dbernstein

    dbernstein New Member

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    Traveler/Boom Modification picture

    Thanks for the tip. Please include a picture of your modification.

    Thanks,

    dbernstein


     
  12. c14_DMS

    c14_DMS New Member

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    Boom Kicker

    I just bought a used Catalina 14.2 this past weekend. I am now learning how to rig it. I like the Boom Kicker that you showed in one of your pictures. Where did you get it and how much did it cost?
     
  13. c14_Scott

    c14_Scott New Member

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    I searched around and found it cheapest at trailersailor.com for $67.95.

    Here's the link to that item on their site:

    http://shop.trailersailor.com/detail-bk.htm?fno=300&group=394&step=2&bnd=Catalina
     
  14. JGM

    JGM Member

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    Sorry this took so long - been on vacation.

    [​IMG]

    The top line is the main attached to a bronze snap with a bowline. The bottom is the traveler with the loop tied around a stainless thimble. Both thimble and snap were purchased at Lowes (if I remember correctly) for less than $10. I suppose you could tie an additional loop to the starboard and port sides of the traveler for sailing in heavy winds. The snap would make switching from one side to the other, during a tack, dare I say...a snap. ;)

    Hope this helps,
    Jim
     
  15. Bdh333

    Bdh333 New Member

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    i have found a way simular tothe above method, which holds holds the main sheet and the boom to the center of the boat; and allows for an adjustable traveler which which allows the main sheet/boom to move to lee ward in high wind. If any one is interested I try to post a picture.
     
  16. jtompkins

    jtompkins New Member

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    I am interested in seeing a picture of this.
     
  17. Bdh333

    Bdh333 New Member

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  18. Bdh333

    Bdh333 New Member

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    The bridle is a triangular line,tied at metal ring "C" where the main sheet attaches. The line runs free through metal rings attached at the corners of the transome, the lines are tied to metal ring "B".
    The snap hook "A" is attached ny line to the nicking strap.
    Imagine unhooking snap A, now pull C. To the right or left-the main sheet (boom) will move to right or left.
    Imagine hooking snap A, on to B; C is limited in it's movement, and the boom is centered on the boat.
    When the wind come up, we release the snap hook, letting the boom move to leeward .
    When we want to head up, we snap it on and center the boom.
     

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