Howdy from TX

Discussion in 'Sunfish Talk' started by Monsoon, Dec 13, 2008.

  1. mike4947

    mike4947 Member

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    Remember to split the deck from the hull includes more than the edge bond. The mast step, foam blocks, daggerboard trunk, not to mention bonding of the cockpit floor to the hull also are bonded. We've yet to see a successful removal and reinstallation. Cutting all those bonds causes more problems than it fixes.
     
  2. DanB

    DanB Crabber

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    Monsoon - I follow you, but as other's have pointed out pulling up the deck is not the recommended approach as there are much less costly and involved methods proven to get the job done. Gail mentioned the info at Sunfish Sailors ( http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sunfish_sailor ) , you might read through their technical stuff and ask questions about it before making a commitment that could result in a bunch of scrap. I think everyone here is talking in terms of fixing it once and sailing for a long time with peace of mind.
     
  3. Gail

    Gail 24186

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    Boats have sat out far longer and not had problems. You really, really don't want to separate the deck. The "glue" used to secure the Styrofoam blocks is a two-part expanding foam which is difficult to control. I have a friend who did it once. He swore never again. There are disks of glue that hold the bottom of the cockpit tub to the bottom of the hull (you might see circles on the bottom of the boat where each of these are). Don't pull those apart. Read about drying a Sunfish hull out. If you have a heated garage (or Quonset hut with your military resources) that you can keep it in all winter, and cut two inspection port holes into it now and set up a fan to blow into one of the holes, you likely will have the Styrofoam fully dry by spring. It's a matter of having very low humidity air circulating inside the hull so the water can migrate out of the Styrofoam and evaporate. Wait to install the actual inspection port until after you have completed your repair(s). Fiberglass is hardy stuff. The gel coat can take the sun and just needs a good polish. Do keep on readin'! I think you'll find you'll save yourself a lot of time and trouble. I have 3 boats that I have in the drying phase. They've lost 30-40 pounds of water. It works!
     
  4. Monsoon

    Monsoon New Member

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    I'm not hellbent on separating the hull; you and others have made valid points not to.

    I have hatches (dry hatches) that are about 4" diameter that are watertight I could install; do you all think this would be suitable?

    More immediately though, how would you recommend pulling the water out of the hull? I just feel like there's too much to try to let evaporate. My garage isn't heated, but is decidedly warmer than the outdoors (attached to house). While the Dallas area isn't exactly wet, it is more moist than I'd expect to be effective for drying; the boat lives in the garage (much to the chagrin of my truck). So any work on the boat will be in a relatively controlled environment.
     
  5. papayamon2

    papayamon2 Member

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    It's amazing how much more access you get from a 6" port compared to a 4". I've installed both and will always do 6" ones from now on. Just my .02 if you're gonna cut some in anyway.
     
  6. DanB

    DanB Crabber

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    Try this sequence –

    . .:) Open the deck drain screw just off the starboard tip of the splash deflector,
    . . . .roll the boat on that side and empty out all the sloshing water
    . . . .( it'll never evaporate out that tiny hole )

    . .:) Weigh the hull by rolling it side up on a bathroom scale
    . . . .( Heaviness above 140 pounds points toward water remaining trapped in the float foam )

    . .:) Leak test the whole boat, not just where you think

    . .:) Install an inspection port or two depending on drying needs
    . . . .and where you want access for repairs.
    . . . .( The round water-tight deck plates that screw in have a proven longevity )

    . .:) Circulate air through the cavity to dry things out ( fixes won't take on a damp boat )

    . .:) Fix the leaks

    . .:cool: Add the rest of your equipment and have a good sail

    All the resources given – Searching past threads in this forum, Windline’s How To, The Sunfish Class FAQ, Sunfish Sailor support group library – have pictures and written instructions for nearly all the above check points. Ask if you run across something not covered or that strikes you as unclear.
     
  7. billmcinnis

    billmcinnis Member

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    The reason for being so careful not to use much pressure isn't for fear of blowing the boat apart. The main problem is that the foam blocks used to stiffen the hull, as well as for flotation, are bonded to the bottom and decks. If too much pressure is applied the hull flexes outward the blocks come un-bonded. The bottom then flexes and slaps excessively when sailing.
     
  8. Gail

    Gail 24186

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    To use Yahoo! Groups, you need to "set up an account." If you don't want to use your regular email address, just make up a Yahoo mail account (write down the address and the password you choose), and use that information to set up your Groups "identity." There is a treasure trove of information on how to take care of these boats.

    Just to get you started, in the Yahoo! Group sunfish_sailor there is a whole set of files on drying out a hull. This is the link to that set of in depth information.

    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sunfi...20REPAIR%20GUIDES%20%80%A0%A0%92%B5%92%B5%20/

    In Texas you will get some warm and dry days, even in winter. Look at using the black garbage bag with fans trick to help dry out the foam.

    The Yahoo! Groups are safe. On rare occasion some garbage gets posted or sneaks through an emailing list, but it gets quashed very, very quickly. If you choose to sign up for some of the email lists, choose the digested version so you can just scroll past junk, should it eke its way through. Wayne monitors this Yahoo! Group and he's done a ton of work to prevent problems and monitors things to keep it all safe and friendly.

    You'll find folks in the Sunfish world to be a friendly, helpful sort. We're happy to have you amongst us. Welcome. Good luck!
     

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