Hi, just got a Super Porpoise

Discussion in 'Sunfish Talk' started by 1974SuperPorpoise, Aug 25, 2009.

  1. 1974SuperPorpoise

    1974SuperPorpoise New Member

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    Hi, this is my first post and just wanted to poke my head in and say hi. I have found forums to be a huge help in doing new things, so here I am.
    First off all I apologize that I don't have a Sunfish but I have something close. This is a true story that happened last week. I'll try to keep it short.

    A friend at work mentioned his grandfather had an old sailboat that they were going to sell. Turns out it was purchased brand new in 1974. The grandfather didn't get around to using it right away so he tied it up from the rafters of his garage. The boat was never touched again until I picked it up last week. All parts were still in their original wrapping and boxes. I put the sail up last night for it's very first time. Hopefully this weekend brings some good sailing weather.

    I hope to learn from this forum even though I have a different boat.
    Thanks.
     
  2. davavd

    davavd OldNSlow

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    Cool story! Brand new 35 year old boat. Lucky you. Now, lets see pictures.
     
  3. 1974SuperPorpoise

    1974SuperPorpoise New Member

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    I just signed up here..is there a post minimum before you can post pics?
     
  4. Wavedancer

    Wavedancer Upside down? Staff Member

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  5. 1974SuperPorpoise

    1974SuperPorpoise New Member

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    I will attempt tp post pics on my next break around 2:30. I have scans of the original instructions and parts list too, but those are on my home computer.
     
  6. 1974SuperPorpoise

    1974SuperPorpoise New Member

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  7. 1974SuperPorpoise

    1974SuperPorpoise New Member

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    I posted pics, it told me a moderator need to approve them. Until then some pice are in my album. Enjoy!!
     
  8. 1974SuperPorpoise

    1974SuperPorpoise New Member

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  9. Fun Fish

    Fun Fish Member

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    You did get a brand new 35 year old boat--looks beautiful and your little sailor looks ready to give her a try!
     
  10. Porpoise2

    Porpoise2 New Member

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    I've got a Porpose II in the same color. At less than 13-feet, it's not my '77 Sunfish's equal. You really have to use the Porpoise' hiking straps due to it's being much narrower. Your Super Porpoise looks longer, and may have fixed that "too-narrow" problem.

    A buddy and I went racing today in strong winds, putting me in the Porpoise II.

    I won regularly last year, even while switching-off between the two boats. It's not as good as the Sunfish was to windward, but seems to have an edge downwind.

    I finished 2nd today, my buddy finished next to last. :p

    As seen in the photo, I'd move that gooseneck to the right on the boom. (Raises the boom and keeps the clew from dragging in the water which leads to a capsize).

    It is a beautiful-looking boat. That color (and most reds in general) tend to fade readily. Perhaps a coat of wax—right now—can keep that "new" gleam. :)

    Congratulations!
     
  11. 1974SuperPorpoise

    1974SuperPorpoise New Member

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    Thanks for the compliment. My daughter (3 1/2) really liked my friends windflite mainly because it was quiet. She says Sea-Doos are too noisey.
     
  12. 1974SuperPorpoise

    1974SuperPorpoise New Member

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    Thank you. the Super Porpoise is 14' 9" long, so it is a little longer than the Sunfish. I have not sailed it yet as I have been working on getting the trailer fit to carry it. My knowledge about sailing stuff is very small right now so it's hard to understand sometimes what i read. I sailed my friends Windflite twice by myself and managed to get back on my own.

    As far as sail position, I have the halyard attached where the instruction said to put it. It did not give a dimension as where to put the gooseneck. Seems most Sunfish I see, the "v" of the sail is lower than the tip of the boom, so I will make an adjustment on the gooseneck.

    Any other suggestions for me as I am anticipating taking it out for the first time?
     
  13. Wayne

    Wayne Member Emeritus

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    You might start out by assuming Molded Products, Inc. put some practical experience into where they placed the gooseneck. Usually the gooseneck is affixed so the sail's attitude is in a functional position simply by attaching the halyard where the instructions say. On a Sunfish this gives the boat handling characteristics suitable for beginning, encroaching on intermediate sailing.

    A point of confusion many beginning Sunfish sailors had was the halyard tie-in given by sail attachment points. In some early instructions it was unclear whether to count down from the top or up from the bottom. On the Sunfish it's up from the bottom..., the tack of the sail where boom and spar meet.

    Today the recommended tie-in point is between the 9th and 10th sail clip. On recreationally rigged boats where no change is being made to the boom position, this results in a boom with a slight downward slant toward the bow. Competition rigged Sunfish can have an even more exaggerated tilt to the boom when it's re-positioned for certain wind conditions.

    As a lateen rig sailor becomes more knowledgeable about the behavior of the boat at different wind strengths, fine tuning the sail's position fore & aft by shifting the boom's position in the gooseneck becomes a useful tool to maintain sailing efficiency. If you are not already familiar with the concept of "weather helm" and identifying, chiefly by feel, when it is becoming excessive, it would be a good idea to leave the gooseneck in its initial location so you have a benchmark to begin experimenting from.

    If you choose to pursure adding more fine tuning adjustability at some point, I believe your Super Porpoise carries 85 sq ft of sail on longer spars. The measurements given for adjusting a Sunfish boom to reduce weather helm will apply in a general sense, but you'll eventually be establishing your own graduations along the boom with your trials under different winds.
     
  14. Wayne

    Wayne Member Emeritus

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    Your daughter gets a BIG gold star in my book... :)
     
  15. 1974SuperPorpoise

    1974SuperPorpoise New Member

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    Thank you Wayne. As far as the gooseneck position goes i'm not sure where it's intended to be. the only dimension given in the instructions was the halyard attachment point measured from the top end down. I just figured putting the gooseneck in a position that visually makes the sail look like others that I have seen.
    Does this make sense for just starting out?

    Also when transporting on the trailer how should my mast, spars and sail be rigged?
    rolled up together, sail rolled up next to spars or ???

    Is there or do i need a bag for them? I don't want to damage something in transit as i am just starting out.

    Thanks.
     
    • Funny Funny x 1
  16. Wayne

    Wayne Member Emeritus

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    In other words I was mistaken and it did not come pre-installed on the boom? ... Bummer.

    Yup, pick a starting point and go from there. You might look into a quick release gooseneck bolt so you can even make boom position changes while out on the water... (Sunfish parts ... or a mountain bike seat post quick release ... what they actually are)



    Put the spars together and loosely roll the sail next to, not around them.

    Sail/spar bags are nice to keep things free of road grit.

    Remember, if things get wet on the trip home, take the sail out of the bag and unroll it to dry.

    Check out the current discussion on spar transport...

    There's lots more... everyone here could write you a book. But rather than duplicate efforts, you can make use of 95% of what's in the Sunfish Bible and the Knowledge Base here and elsewhere.
    http://www.apsltd.com/p-10096-book-the-sunfish-bible.aspx

    I think I'd try this halyard location (see picture - redline)
     

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  17. Wayne

    Wayne Member Emeritus

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    BTW..., where'd you get your trailer and what did it set you back?
     
  18. 1974SuperPorpoise

    1974SuperPorpoise New Member

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    It's a 2006 Yacht Club PWC trailer I got off craigslist for $400. Came with bearing buddies and tongue jack. I tool off the bunks and have it rigged up to work for now. this winter I want to make a couple nice padded cradles for it.

    Alsp...thanks for your replies!
     
  19. Wayne

    Wayne Member Emeritus

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  20. Porpoise2

    Porpoise2 New Member

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    Y'know, that sail may be the most fragile part of your "new" sailboat.

    Because of its unique "Porpoise" logo, that sail might never be reproduced or replaced; whereas, nearly everything else can be exchanged with readily-available Sunfish parts. (Except that bow handle, which appears to be a proprietary part).

    I'd be tempted to use a second-hand Sunfish sail to start out with, and use the original sail "for show".

    (I have a perfect-replacement Sunfish sail on my Porpoise II).

    Another item is that rub-rail. Mine has taken a beating over the years, and I'd start looking for a suitable replacement. J.C. Whitney & Co. carried something similar.

    Generally speaking, a longer waterline should mean better speed. The Portsmouth Ratings are highly favorable to Sunfish, (rather than to the Sunfish's "clone-fish"). I think that may be due to the higher number of returned reports of race outcomes, rather than some drawback of design.

    The Porpoise has a very interesting cockpit drain system. From what I can see from underneath the hull, it apparently "stores" water washed into the cockpit until a favorable boat orientation allows it to drain out! :eek:
     

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