Got blown down today...

Discussion in 'Capri/Catalina 14 Talk' started by pat earing, Jul 30, 2015.

  1. pat earing

    pat earing Can't we sail the Capri instead?

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    Everything worked as planned-mast float and ladder. Silly idiot driving the boat... who takes a capri out in winds at 15-20 with gusts to 40? I did. Alone. Everything was fine until I was forced into a nasty jibe (I could not execute a tack to save my life within a series of massive gusts.) and the jib got hung up on the stay. No jib? No steering... what a mess. Finally got it sorted out and heading home when I got smacked into the drink. Lots of lessons learned today, but everything worked spectacularly.

    Cheers

    pat
     
  2. boat

    boat Member

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    I'm not big on small boat jibes in heavy and gusty winds. Rather than jibe I usually choose to do a 270 degree turn which results in the same objective as a jibe and far less likely to end up demonstrating how to get a boat back to where the big stick points toward the sky. This will work if you are out in far too much wind wishing you were back on shore drinking a glass of wine and watching the other little boats fight the weather. Try it...;)
     
  3. boat

    boat Member

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    I guess I need to go back to reading school.:confused: To tack I try to first get up good speed and then operate the tiller slowly at first and then add in a bit more tiller as the boat starts to turn. I tend to trim the sail all of the way through the tack. You can use the sails to maintain power everywhere except when the boat is in irons which is only a second or two. At times I position the boom using my hand if I need to back wind it to finish a tack. Actually, back winding the main is the easiest way to get out of irons so I guess the main can create drive no mater where your boat is pointed:oops:

    A common mistake is to quickly push the tiller full a-lee when starting a tack. More often than not the rudder will act like a big brake robbing most of your forward motion if not stopping the boat in its tracks! Knowing how much and when to adjust the position of the rudder is a skill that will come with time. The next time you start to tack push the tiller full/hard a-lee and then look at what is happening to the rudder - bubbles, stirring water and killing your speed.:eek:
     
  4. pat earing

    pat earing Can't we sail the Capri instead?

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    Thanks for the support. I know the principle as I owned a Hobbie 14 for years; and, without a jib it was a challenge of finesse getting one to tack ( often a jibe was just safer and easier...) but the wind was so intense that the Capri would just die and be blown back into the reach I was on. I ran out of room and had no choice but to ground or jibe. I clearly need to learn the process for the Capri in winds that high; but, to be honest, I don't need to be out in winds like that...
    The mistake I made was not having the jib in tight as I jibed... the jib went around the outside of the stay and then got tangled. I learned a lesson; as, without the jib, in those winds I had a VERY hard time making head way with the main-I either was getting knocked nearly down or blown down wind...
     
  5. douga7002

    douga7002 New Member

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  6. douga7002

    douga7002 New Member

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    When I execute a jibe I haul the boom in close as I start the jibe. That keeps the boom from making a violent swing to the other side of the boat.
     
  7. pat earing

    pat earing Can't we sail the Capri instead?

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    Thanks-I didn't get knocked over by the jibe. In fact everyone that saw the maneuver commented on how well I did in that wind. The only negative outcome of the jibe was that I did not have the jib close hauled as I had attempted a tack (fourth one!) that failed and had to do something or run aground. The jib wrapped the wrong way around the stay and then got caught... A cluster for sure!

    Cheers

    Pat
     
  8. boat

    boat Member

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    If you sail a lot in high winds then I suggest that you may want to consider a couple of heavy weather sails. That would be a smaller jib and a main with one or two reefing points sown in. Sailing in higher winds is no big deal if you are equipped for the weather. If you cannot de-power the sails by reducing the sail area high winds eventually become impossible. Small boats line the C14 are not set-up for high winds and are intended for light to moderate winds. The C14 sail cloth is light and easily blown out (stretched) which changes the shape of the sail making it less efficient. The only way to get the sails reasonably productive again is to re-cut the sail setting the draft in the peek performance position. I have reclaimed a number of sails in the past by taking them apart, cutting the panels and then sowing the thing up again. For me this can be an all day project but a lot cheaper than purchasing a new sail (thread and my time is the only expense).
     
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  9. pat earing

    pat earing Can't we sail the Capri instead?

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    I have looked into having the main set up with reefing points. Just haven't done it yet. If we were to commit to more time on lake Superior, I think it would be a must.
    A storm jib-two weeks ago I would have scoffed at the idea because I had been told that the Capri couldn't go down on the jib alone. I now know that that is not true... The factory cut is plenty big enough in a large blow to take the boat over. I doubt I will spring for one, especially if I get the main up dated... just not willing to be in winds that big on purpose again.

    Thanks for the advice

    Pat
     
  10. boat

    boat Member

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    My point is that the C14 is not designed for big winds but if big wind is your desire or your only option then heavier smaller sails makes boat very manageable in some pretty strong wind. It will remain very tender but can be a real joy to sail while others set on the dock and watch in ah. The down side is the different sails are useless if you focus on racing. The bottom line is - what do you want to do and what kind of weather are you going to do it in...
     
  11. kdub

    kdub Member

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    Does anyone have dimensions for a set of high wind sails. If you do where did you get them? I was thinking they would need to be custom made, the balance would need to be just right between the size of main and jib. I remember one of my sailing mentors telling me "you should have a suit for all occasions, right?"
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 26, 2015

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