Getting ready to start repair

Discussion in 'Sunfish Talk' started by joel2, Sep 16, 2017.

  1. joel2

    joel2 New Member

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    The hole is right in front of the gudgeon plate. The closest part of the circle to the g plate is where it won't cut through. The jig saw is what it is. I've researched different blades and I'm pretty sure they don't come longer. I'm about to use the circle I cut as guide and hopefully get a hack saw to cut through this. Do you have any suggestions please?

    When you say take the yellow foam out from the bottom not the top is that right side up or down?

    No idea of rudder bracket and now I need to fix wood?

    Don't understand how to see if mast hole is leaking, pretty certain neither of these holes gives a view of that area?

    I thought this stage was easy, why do I have so many problems? Perhaps try to be kind and don't answer that.
     
  2. Webfoot1

    Webfoot1 Active Member

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    Need to post a picture of what you are doing. If it's a Sunfish the only thing of substance
    to under the fiberglass is the wood backing plate, maybe, if it is extending that far forward.
    Unless someone else popped the deck at some time and replaced it with something else.
    Remove the top gudgeon plate and see if someone has replaced the wood screws with
    machine screws. Since I take it you've cut at least half the circumference of the circle
    you could make a cut bisecting the circle. Should leave a opening big enough to find
    out whats under the other half of the circle.

    The yellow expanding foam holds the Closed Cell foam blocks in place. It's on the top
    and bottom of the foam blocks.
     
  3. beldar boathead

    beldar boathead Well-Known Member

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    One of the posters on the prior page told you how to check mast step for leaks.
     
  4. joel2

    joel2 New Member

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    The images won't load for some reason. Is it because it's on my phone?
    circle is complete it just is not cutting all the way through at the back end.
    Is there something wrong with cutting a different circle slightly forward overlapping this one and it won't be in the way of anything? And repairing this cut?
     
  5. Webfoot1

    Webfoot1 Active Member

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    I'd work on figuring out how to finish the cutout. Overlapping circles make a mess.
    Perhaps time for the Hole-Saw?

    Hole saw - Wikipedia
     
  6. wjejr

    wjejr Member

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    Hi Joel2,

    You may find these pictures of use.

    I replaced the wood backer block for the gudgeon on my boat (1971) 2 or 3 years ago.

    I used a saber saw with standard length blades to cut the circle. When cutting the circle, I cut through the glass deck, foam and the backer block. You can see all of that in the pictures. It was difficult to pry up the fiberglass cutout, as it was stuck to the expanding foam.

    Once the cutout was removed, I pried the end of the backer block out. I then used a hacksaw blade to cut out the foam.

    Hope this helps you.

    If you or anyone else decides to replace the backer block let me know, and I will post the rest of the pictures.

    Hmmm, seems like I posted some of the pictures twice.
     

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  7. Light and Variable Winds

    Light and Variable Winds Well-Known Member

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    If the saw you're using won't cut through the wood backing plate, you can finish the cut by using a hack saw blade—by hand. (Or get a longer blade for the saw you're using—is it a saber-saw?)

    Joel2 wrote:


    The images won't load for some reason. Is it because it's on my phone?
    circle is complete it just is not cutting all the way through at the back end.

    Is there something wrong with cutting a different circle slightly forward overlapping this one and it won't be in the way of anything? And repairing this cut?

    I'd move to a larger inspection port, which would save the time in repairing.

    There are 6-inch and 8-inch inspection ports available.

    .
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2017
  8. joel2

    joel2 New Member

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    There is white foam under this circle(the part I can cut through)
    I can take that all out????
     
  9. Webfoot1

    Webfoot1 Active Member

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    Only remove what's under the inspection port, the foam
    helps support the rear deck. The foam forward of the
    inspection port still has a job to do.
     
  10. joel2

    joel2 New Member

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    I'm moving the inspection port slightly forward. It will intersect the circle I have now. I don't understand the reason to keep it where it is and deal with what's in the way under it.
    Please give me a reason not to do that.
    After cutting this intersecting circle which is a few inches forward, I need to cut out the white foam under it. Can I do without this amount of foam? Then let the boat dry out and patch the old circle (along with I still don't know what else).
     
  11. beldar boathead

    beldar boathead Well-Known Member

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    The reason not to do that is the white foam is there too.
     
  12. joel2

    joel2 New Member

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    So it's no worst! This is the place I was told to put it!
    Isn't there a place where there isn't foam?
     
  13. Light and Variable Winds

    Light and Variable Winds Well-Known Member

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    Don't worry about the white Styrofoam that you can't see. There's plenty left elsewhere.

    If you haven't made a second cut, deal with the wooden backing block. It's a lot easier than repairing one's over-exuberant fiberglass removal. To cut away the wood, you may need to rent (or borrow) a wood router.

    Retain the fiberglass portions that you remove for later repairs.

    Remove enough white foam as if a four-inch inspection port had been installed instead. The objective has always been to dry out the boat's interior. All you need is a vent. Nobody's going to inspect what's under your inspection port.
     
  14. mixmkr

    mixmkr Active Member

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    IDK.... You guys are always posting pictures of the insides of the boat in these threads!!! You dont have to scroll far to see one!! :)
     
  15. joel2

    joel2 New Member

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    [​IMG][/IMG]
    if either way I am taking out white foam I don't understand why it is suggested to use the option of taking out foam and working with wood? I am trying to follow the instructions given to me and I still got it wrong.
    I don't care what it looks like underneath the port, I just want the boat to float and not collect water. Those are my only requirements here.
     
  16. Webfoot1

    Webfoot1 Active Member

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    You did not get anything wrong. It's only a two step process. . .

    1. Cut the circle. (done)
    2. Remove the foam DIRECTLY UNDER the circle.

    If you try to move the hole THEN you've done something wrong.
    I may be wrong but I'm getting the feeling we are communicating
    through Google Translator or something.
     
  17. joel2

    joel2 New Member

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    I appreciate all your help and you are correct about needing a translator. For the life of me I can't understand why I should cut/replace wood if I don't have to. Moving circle still requres taking out foam. I don't know where there is an area that does not have foam nor wood. Don't have the answer
     
  18. beldar boathead

    beldar boathead Well-Known Member

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    You don’t need to replace any wood unless the wood the rudder components are screwed into is rotted. So just get the wood and foam that are in your way out of there and you can begin the drying process. You have put the port just about where it should be, so you just need to finish the job. No need to cut more holes. Good luck!
     
  19. Light and Variable Winds

    Light and Variable Winds Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the picture. Now we know the circle is cut, and the approximate year of your boat. You can now take a knife (fork or spoon) to the Styrofoam.

    You're looking at the top of a rectangular block of Styrofoam, with empty space to the right OR left. So cutting right OR left for ventilation will still leave some Styrofoam for deck support.
     
  20. signal charlie

    signal charlie Active Member Staff Member

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    Finish removing the foam and wood remnant from that hole, you don't need it. You need to remove it so you can install your port. You only need to take out a hand size piece of foam.

    Take a look at our blog and see if that clears up any of your questions: Small Boat Restoration: Sunfish Rudder Conversion
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2017

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