DIY Daggerboard

Discussion in 'Sunfish Talk' started by szpatterson, Nov 1, 2009.

  1. szpatterson

    szpatterson New Member

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    Hi,

    I would like to make a new daggerboard, and i am thinking of adding an integral handle out of the same piece of wood, angled slightly towards the cockpit to make it easier to pull up. How far do you guys think the daggerboard should stick up above the well?

    Also, im thinking of using pegs as stops (below the handle), as compared to the wood strips used on the original. Any thoughts on this?

    Thanks
  2. szpatterson

    szpatterson New Member

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    Any and all input would be appreciated, along with tips in general for making a new daggerboard....

    Sam
  3. beldar boathead

    beldar boathead Active Member

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    Couple thoughts:
    1) pick a good wood. If you search on this forum, you will find other "make your own" board posts, and you can see what the experts recommend for wood. I cannot recall their suggestions
    2) Just trace a daggerboard on your wood, cut it, taper the edges, and varnish.
    3) the problem with your handle idea is you will find at some point that you want to mount a block (aka pulley) on the deck to replace the hook that is on the lip now. Your handle would interfere with where the block should go.
    4) pegs should be fine. No reason to have the board protrude more than 3" or so above the deck when the board is down.

    Hope this helps. It will be a fun project.

    BB
  4. szpatterson

    szpatterson New Member

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    I plan on using wana, a hardwood from Suriname that i happen to have some boards of laying around.

    As for the handle, i already have a block and clam cleat mounted on the deck, and i meant to have the handle just up, not back, in the way. The handle would be just continuous with the board, a simple, diagonally slanted hole to help me grab and pull.

    Thanks,
    Sam
  5. Webfoot

    Webfoot New Member

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    Easy way is to fix a leather strap across the top of your standard daggerboard. If you're not racing, shaping the board into a foil instead of the regulation taper will give better performance.

    http://www.duckworksmagazine.com/06/howto/foils/index.htm

    If you are after speed, go with the old elliptical board. If running close hauled is important, go with the later square daggerboard.

    Look for info on squareing off the trailing edge of the dagger board to reduce drag. There is a math formula for doing it that relates to the area of the leading edge vs. the squared ofg trailing edge. Car companys use it on their compact cars, the ones with bobbed rear ends.
  6. mike4947

    mike4947 Member

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    Since your doing a DIY board that won't be class legal anyway why not use the template in the THE CLASS_RULES which is a much better style board and gives you the location for your handle hole and the peg location for stoppers.
  7. Wayne

    Wayne Member Emeritus

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    I recall back in the '90s when I purchased my first composite board it came with a warning about fingers getting crunched. Over the years I've noticed issues with the stop peg. Just recently I see the opening in the composite board has been eliminated altogether. You might be wise to do a little research before you go off and create some sort of digital guillotine.

    On another note, if you are putting in the effort, there's no reason not to duplicate the composite board since it's absolutely the best performing board for any year boat. Secondarily, if shaping the intricacies of a true foil are too time consuming or beyond the capabilities of the shop equipment you have, the Barrington style would be next best. If it's a classic look rather than performance you desire, then go for the old round-tip. Nobody ever copies the "Shadow" board since it's stylized cants and tapers proved to be a real dog when it came to performing.
  8. szpatterson

    szpatterson New Member

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    Thanks, everybody, for the input.

    I believe i am just going to duplicate the shape of my original ('76) board, and add 3 or four inches of height above the stops (which will probably be 2 pegs on each side) to integrate a handle. This extra height would only be on the forward facing side, and it would slant down as it proceeds aft, with the handle just below the edge.

    Because i was perfectly content with the old board, I am definitely not going to chase down small improvements in performance for my simple daysailing, so the better design isn't that crucial. I'll be sure to post some pictures as i get it built.

    Sam
  9. szpatterson

    szpatterson New Member

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    This is a cardboard mock-up of my planned board, traced from my original and then modified. The handle hole would have to be moved forward and down some to allow for a sound chunk of wood. The small hole would be for the bungee, and the two black dots would be the pegs.

    Attached Files:

  10. beldar boathead

    beldar boathead Active Member

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    A few thoughts. I can't see the image you attached for some reason, but if memory serves, 1976 boats had the Shadow daggerboard, which is just a toothpick compared to the Barrington and Round Bottom boards. Even for casual daysailing you will notice a difference if you use a board other than the Shadow. You will point much better.

    The racing boards (composite) made now have only one peg. You might want to think about that - simpler and no disadvantage at all vs. two pegs (as long as your pegs don't break.) BB
  11. szpatterson

    szpatterson New Member

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    Honestly, i was rather content with my old board. And upon using my spare (i know it is newer and a different shape, but not when it was purchased), i have found that i prefer the old one.

    As for the pegs, you are absolutely correct.

    Thanks,
    Sam
  12. Wayne

    Wayne Member Emeritus

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    OK, Back to your original question. . .

    How high, IMHO, will be a matter of function for your sailing style. At this point you’ve answered part of your own question by doing a mock-up and noting the handle needs enough wood around it to be sound. The only other issue I see is, will the extra amount that sticks up interfere with sailing the boat. Again, probably best answered by installing the mock-up and looking at it.


    Nothing functional that I can think of aside from the horizontal alignment of two pegs is more difficult to achieve than using a single wood block.


    Once you’ve answered for yourself that the protruding fin isn’t an interference to your sailing, it’s simply a matter of stylizing your boat to suite your taste … Sure, Go For It. Worst case is you saw it back and make it like the original, maybe this go-around adding a brass handle screwed on top.


    I can understand that. Since you are leisure sailing you’ve probably never measured performance objectively. You’ve simply become accustom to the behavior of your board’s design and that’s become your comfort zone. Changing designs now makes handling feel awkward. You are functioning in a subjective environment and don’t need anybody else’s approval, but your own.

    Party on… :cool:
  13. szpatterson

    szpatterson New Member

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    Thanks for the input.
    As i complete the board, i will post pictures

    Sam

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