Deck Repair Suggestions

Discussion in 'Sunfish Talk' started by Light and Variable Winds, Jul 8, 2017.

  1. Light and Variable Winds

    Light and Variable Winds Well-Known Member

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    Supported by the tub, the inside edge has taken some hits. Over the years, this damage has progressed to the point that it has become a thorn in my backside. :confused:.

    I'll be using epoxy. That I can see, there's no alternative but to grind down into the edge of the tub, and build up several layers of fiberglass--use cloth?

    Seeing that this area is likely to be damaged again, how large an area should be ground down?

    0705171212_HDR.jpg
     
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  2. mixmkr

    mixmkr Active Member

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    That doesn't look all that bad. Just grind out the minimum, but what's damaged. Use as much glass/cloth as possible obviously. It should be almost 1/4" thick...or 3/16.. And a good layup should be as good as new. I see nothing wrong with regular resin but I know you like West. But generally you're just grinding out the damage with enough repair overlay edge and typically no need for more. 1/8-3/16" sounds thin but it should be strong enough. ...and you might grind enough BUT just before GOING THRU....or just barely in places. It'll make laying cloth that much easier. A couple layers of a lighter weight cloth might be easier than one chunk of woven roving also and easier to final fair. I like fairing with mat and then a skim coat of fairing stuff
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2017
  3. Webfoot1

    Webfoot1 Active Member

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    Fiberglass patch is suppose to be 12 percent bigger than the damaged area. It may
    just be cracked gelcoat. If so you can groove out the crack in the gel-coat and marine-tex
    it. For those of us who don't do a lot of fiberglass work, the best way to get a repair that
    does not look worse then when we started is to lay up on the back-side of the damage then
    groove and Marine-Tex the cracked gel-coat. I get the feeling if that crack bugs you, you'll be
    more bugged by a rookie looking repair.
     
  4. mixmkr

    mixmkr Active Member

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    I've heard it to be much more.... 13.4- 14.87% at least!! ;-D
     
  5. Light and Variable Winds

    Light and Variable Winds Well-Known Member

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    One half of the back side of the damage can't be reached! :confused:
     
  6. Webfoot1

    Webfoot1 Active Member

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    Well, it being a Sunfish you could just go the Marine-Tex route for
    now. If the crack reappears you could go to more complicated measures
    as in fiberglass patching. If the damage is on the tub flange check and
    see if the flange has not separated from the deck. It might give you
    a option of wedging the deck-tub seam open a little to slide a patch
    in. These type of repairs are where you put the problem in you mind
    and let it rattle around for a few days.
     
  7. Light and Variable Winds

    Light and Variable Winds Well-Known Member

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    Today, I pushed down on the inside edge. That corner flexes quite a bit. :(
     
  8. mixmkr

    mixmkr Active Member

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    Thin glass flexes but can still be strong. Think pole vault pole
    Looks what you have is just some gel cracking a some minor grinding should be all that's needed. If desired you could always reinforce under the deck overhang into the cockpit and down the tub wall. Like mentioned, finish work will either devalue your boat or you've maintained its worth
     
  9. Webfoot1

    Webfoot1 Active Member

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    Guess it may be structural crack after all. Well, after grinding off the Gel-Coat and
    patching the top of the deck you'll get to play with a Praval Sprayer
    and Gel-Coat. Should be worth the price of admission just for the experience.
    Should be doable for less than $100.

    I was just outside power washing a free
    Sunfish someone gave me. Boat only weighs about 100 lbs. I think most of
    the foam was removed. All the trim is ruined with monster size pop-rivets. I'd
    have to pay $175 to replace the trim. Someone replaced the splash rail with a second
    set of holes. Seems to have ventilated the boat well. With all the holes and no foam
    I think it's worthy of the U-Boat designation.
     
  10. Light and Variable Winds

    Light and Variable Winds Well-Known Member

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    Check the Internet for alternative pop-rivets. There's quite a variety out there that could save your trim. You may need to buy a new and unique pop-rivet gun, but it'll be cheaper than the replacement of new aluminum trim.

    I'll be using West System epoxy, but only because I bought a gallon of resin ten years ago.:oops:

    Good idea. :)

    I'll cover the damage with duct tape, and repair it later--maybe wait for the off-season.

    With duct tape and WD-40, the world's challenges can vanquished! :cool:
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2017
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  11. mixmkr

    mixmkr Active Member

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    Don't forget visegrips.
     
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  12. Light and Variable Winds

    Light and Variable Winds Well-Known Member

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    Vise-Grips will work, but I'd prefer to sit on this damage using duct tape.

    :D
     
  13. mixmkr

    mixmkr Active Member

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    No... Vise grips are THE important tool....for leaving a "signature"!

    Unless you prefer to leave a signature with pliers...like on a hex bolt head! :)
     
  14. Alan S. Glos

    Alan S. Glos Active Member

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    L&VW,

    Here is a link to the Sunfish guy in Burlington, VT: SUNFISH SAILBOATS

    Alan Glos
     
  15. mixmkr

    mixmkr Active Member

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    the guy does a greatjob. Gelcoat looks very nice and some nicely designed sails
     
  16. Light and Variable Winds

    Light and Variable Winds Well-Known Member

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    This may be the guy who vacuums-up all the "good stuff" in New England.

    Not that there's anything wrong with that!:confused:

    Member jleonard, are you following this thread?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 16, 2017
  17. jleonard99

    jleonard99 Sunny Sailer

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    I like how that guy has his shop set up and all the boats look nice. I would like to do something similar.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 16, 2017
  18. Dickhogg

    Dickhogg New Member

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    It is amazing to me that if this was your business you wouldn't be a regular on this forum.
     
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  19. jleonard99

    jleonard99 Sunny Sailer

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    I agree, I generally check the posts several times a day. I'm surprised we haven't seen his listings.
     

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