De-masted in Mission Bay 2013

Discussion in 'Capri/Catalina 14 Talk' started by Ken Perine, Sep 12, 2013.

  1. kdub

    kdub Member

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    When I went through this I had to cut my mast. I had a shop make the stays for me and the material they had to work with was slightly larger than the stock Capri rigging. Custom made professional, and I have peace of mind that it is ironclad, all three stays were upgraded, but I suppose that I can't build up the step without adding new chain plates with what I have now. This is getting my gears turning for a winter project.
     
  2. boat

    boat Member

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    I am new to the 14.2 so I probably have a stupid observation. I have no desire to repair my deck or the bottom of my mast due to a stay failure so I plan to make a change to the way the mast is attached to the step. I will replace the massive bolt at the base of the mast with a piece of aluminum tubing or perhaps a nylon bolt. An aluminum tube can easily be threaded on both ends and nylon wing nuts installed. The lighter "bolt" should easily hold the mast in place while allowing the mast to sheer the bolt rather than tearing up everything. Trial and error will determine if I need to use the strength of a standard bolt to step the mast. From the couple of times I have stepped the mast I doubt the added strength of the bolt will be needed.

    I fail to see why a stainless bolt was used in the first place. It appears all of the stays force the mast downward when under load; not so much lateral pressure. The twist on the mast base as well as forward or aft pressure should be minimal so why such a massive bolt? With the lighter "bolt" arrangement a the mast will still come down with a stay failure but the damage to the boat would likely be limited to a bent "bracket" rather a ripped out deck and damage the mast.

    I suspect this is an old idea but I plan to give it a try again. Any thoughts from the experienced masters of the craft?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 19, 2014
  3. kdub

    kdub Member

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    There is an older thread somewhere on the forum where they made some relief cuts on the bracket to allow it to release the mast and bolt in the event the rigging fails. If you have time to search you could find pictures on the forum, I remember seeing it and thinking to myself "that's a clever idea".
     
  4. douga7002

    douga7002 New Member

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    The wind load on your sails is transferred to the mast and resisted by the stays and the base of the mast where it is attached to the deck, so there will be a small horizontal force exerted at the base of the mast under normal sailing conditions. This force is resisted by the bolt. I suggest that if you use a smaller nylon bolt that you also carry spare bolts. Also, if the bolt shears off watch out for the mast and boom to come crashing around since the top of the mast will be attached to the boat and the base of the mast will have to go somewhere. Let us know how it works for you. Good luck.
     
  5. Flyer

    Flyer New Member

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    Has anyone considered added a second cable to both the shroud and the forestay as backup? It would not cause any problems on the shrouds and limited interference on the forestay.
     
  6. boat

    boat Member

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    On the boats I have owned or worked on (not the 14.2) I have found that shrouds, forestays etc. in fact, any of the standing rigging, typically fails due to corrosion in the crimp joint or ripping loose from the deck or mast. The majority of the time it has been the crimp joint that failed due to corrosion. I have seen and maid countless swage/crimp joints over the years but I have only seen a few fail due to the actual “un-corroded” joint and those were VERY poorly done. I have seen a second set of shrouds added but felt that a better answer is to simply replace the standing rigging on a regular basis. While this is an expense I always consider it as insurance. The “normal” life span of the rigging is hard to determine. Is the boat used in fresh or salt water? Is it stored inside or outside? Is it moored or stored on a trailer? Each of these options contributes to determining when to replace the standing rigging. I had a sail boat that was around 50 years old when I sold it and it has spent the past 11 years on open water yet still has the same original rigging. I had another boat that had a shroud fail after only two years so go figure…


    I am new to the 14.2 so I can only guess at the life of the standing rigging. My 14.2 was built in the early 80s so I have replaced the standing rigging as a precaution and the total cost was under $100. It may be over kill but I plan to replace it again in another 5 to 10 years which makes the “insurance” $10 to $20 per year which I believe is reasonable. It is certainly cheaper and easier than repairing a ripped out deck and mast base.


    I must say that the standing rigging on my boat was probably the original stuff and it still looked OK. However, I sliced, polished and etched one of the old crimp joints and found corrosion through the entire length of the crimp. I couldn’t tell if it was near failure or good for another 30 years but I do feel better having new rigging.


    Just my thoughts and I suspect someone with more experience can correct any errors I have made in judgment or technical opinions.


    The 14.2 seems to be a great boat and perfect for teaching young folks how to sail a slupe.
     
  7. Steve Rose

    Steve Rose Member

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    The boat is off the lake and in winter storage for the next six months. Here are two photos of my Hobie bob implementation. This approach, two aluminum extrusions and two aluminum plates, requires no drilling of the mast, just a slightly longer bolt through the masthead pulley.
     

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  8. Karl R. Wurst

    Karl R. Wurst New Member

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    What is the size of the aluminum extrusion you used?
     
  9. Steve Rose

    Steve Rose Member

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    1"x 2"
     
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  10. Karl R. Wurst

    Karl R. Wurst New Member

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    Thanks!
     

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