Considering buying a Capri 14

Discussion in 'Capri/Catalina 14 Talk' started by SmoothSail'n, Jul 31, 2017.

  1. SmoothSail'n

    SmoothSail'n New Member

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    I am a new sailor considering buying a Capri 14.

    I have heard some people love the capris, some hate them. The local club has a few that they rent and race so there are some folks with experience around my local area that I can ask for advice in the future as well.

    The boat I am looking at is the fixed keel version, which I have read is tamer and better mannered than the centerboard version. Is this correct?

    This is my list of things to look for when I inspect the boat:

    fiberglass cracks / obvious repairs?
    sails in good shape
    standing rigging
    running rigging
    keel bolts (ever ran aground?)

    any repairs known
    any repairs needed
    any parts known missing
    any modifications to note


    Does anyone have any further things I should look for or ask about?
     
  2. Al W

    Al W Member

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    Welcome SmoothSail'n to the group. When I looked at my boat to buy the mast was loaded on the deck and trailer sail slot down. I neglected to look at the complete sail slot and the previous owner did not tell me the mast had been "stressed".
    Follow the track from the bottom to the top and make sure the slot is the same width with no bulge anywhere. See pic to see the bulge I missed. Not easy to deal with, the sail falls out.
    Good Luck
    Al IMG_6276.JPG
     
  3. SmoothSail'n

    SmoothSail'n New Member

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    That is definitely something I wouldn't have thought to look for! Thanks for the advice!!!
     
  4. caprintx

    caprintx New Member

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    If you consider the centerboard model, check for any cracks in the centerboard. Mine has a possibly catastrophic hairline crack that I didn't notice until a couple weeks after I'd bought it.
     
  5. Alan j

    Alan j New Member

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    Honestly one of the main things to check is the integrity of the fiberglass. Forcefully push down hard on every section of the hull and look for soft spots cracks etc. and then the aluminum, I.e. Mast ,boom, tiller gungions.
    Inspect the center board as best you can like caprintx says ,make shur center board is sound. If the hull is acceptable then you can haggle for price based on the rest of the boat.
    You can find really good deals with sound hulls but the rest of the vessel might need attention.
    New sails new lines new stays, if you research the cost of all those parts you can bring that to the table and explain how much it's going to cost to make her sailable.
    Leave your rose eye glasses at home and you eventually find a steal and pride of ownership after working on bringing her back to life.
     
  6. Kerrcat14.2K

    Kerrcat14.2K New Member

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    Nothing to add about the inspection replies, sound information.
    I sail a 2016 model 14.2 Keel version which was purchased new from Catalina in the late summer of 2015. Coming from a Tanzer 16, a Tanzer 22, and a Cape Dory Typhoon I wanted a stable yet responsive sailing dingy which would be kept in the water at my dock during the season, mostly single handed, and not as tender as the center board version. She draws two feet, has 200 pounds of ballast in the keel, and has met every expectation so far. From light air up to at least 20 mph gusts I have had no problems sailing single handed without reefing the main (ordered with reef points). Hung a Honda 2.3 on the o/b motor bracket as an auxiliary and it is more than enough kick without adding too much weight on the stern. Kerr Lake is a 50,000 acre freshwater lake along the NC/Va state line and offers all of the sailing opportunities I need. Go for it as long as you are comfortable with the integrity of the hull and rigging.
     

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