Bridle length for 11'3" mystery boat

Discussion in 'Sailing Talk' started by Kitecop, Jan 11, 2017.

  1. Kitecop

    Kitecop New Member

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    what is the rule for bridle length? Just long enough so the tiller clears underneath it when steering?
     
  2. Wavedancer

    Wavedancer Upside down? Staff Member

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  3. Kitecop

    Kitecop New Member

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    I didnt mean racing rule. Just in general. Not even going on a sunfish. Wuts too short wuts too long?
     
  4. signal charlie

    signal charlie Active Member Staff Member

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    Yes, clear of the tiller would work. You don't want it too long because it keeps a tiller from getting too far away from you, hence the term "bridle."
     
  5. LaLi

    LaLi Active Member

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    This depends totally on what kind of rig you have. In short, for a sloop rig (main + jib) you generally want the mainsheet lead to be centred (or even to windward of the centreline) and/or as high as possible, while for a una rig (main only) you want the opposite - low and to leeward. This is because of the very different aerodynamic roles the sails play in the different rigs.

    Simple bridle for a sloop rig main: tie the block on the centreline and adjust the tails so that the mainsheet blocks almost touch when the sheet is at its very tightest.

    Simple bridle for a una rig boat: have the block run freely along the whole length of the bridle, and adjust the length so it's as tight as possible without major frictional issues.
     
  6. Kitecop

    Kitecop New Member

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    Mine is a sloop. So my bridle should be pretty slacked and when its tight it should almost reach the boom when the main is sheeted all the way in? Just enough room for the block between the boom and the bridle?
     
  7. LaLi

    LaLi Active Member

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    I see now your boat on the other thread! Yes, basically as high and centred as possible; you probably want to discard the linked traveller blocks altogether and tie the sheet straight to the middle of the bridle line.

    On the other hand, the jib looks very small and has a fairly wide non-adjustable sheeting angle, so it's possible that the optimum main angle is actually a few degrees to leeward. I would still rig the above-described system, go sailing and see what happens.

    In any case, your boat needs a vang. And a tiller extension. And maybe a longer tiller as well.
     
  8. Kitecop

    Kitecop New Member

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    I have already cucked the linked blocks. I was going to replace with a single block tied to the end of the main sheet but you r saying i dont need one there?

    It needs a vang where? Ive got a tiller extension in the works via ebay, if that doesnt work ill break out the tig welder and pick up some stainless. Or maybe fabricate one from a carbon golf shaft.
     
  9. sailcraftri

    sailcraftri Well-Known Member

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    The coupled blocks are there because the mainsheet should start at the becket block on the end of the boom, go to the traveler block, back up to the boom end block then forward. This gives you a little more purchase. Similar to a Laser sailboat. The bridle not only allows the mainsheet to slide port and starboard but to also keep the tiller (rudder) from slamming all the way tp port or starboard. However your tiller is short so it may not help you unless you made a longer tiller.
     
  10. LaLi

    LaLi Active Member

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    Yes, you probably won't need the mainsheet lead to move sideways at all. It depends on how the whole rig works, so you have to test it first.

    Between the front half of the boom and the mast foot is the traditional place :D You really need to control the boom vertically; a simple block-and-tackle system more or less like the original Laser vang would do the job.

    I noticed the becket block at the end of the boom, too, but this is such a tiny boat with a very small sailplan, so that you most likely won't need that purchase.
     
  11. tag

    tag my2fish

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  12. Kitecop

    Kitecop New Member

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    I wondered how the boom kept from rising... That vang system from the laser seems like overkill though.
     
  13. sailcraftri

    sailcraftri Well-Known Member

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    For this boat I would go with a simple 3:1 or 4:1 boom vang.
     
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  14. Kitecop

    Kitecop New Member

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    Anyone got a drawing or pic of what i need to put on there? I just took the boat out for the first time w just the main, hardly any wind just bird farts. But i was able to putts around and go up wind easily. I ended up using the tail end of the halyard to tie the gooseneck down to the base of the mast.
     
  15. LaLi

    LaLi Active Member

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    [​IMG]
     
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  16. sailcraftri

    sailcraftri Well-Known Member

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    I have some of these parts available. Contact me at cjo1023 at yahoo dot com.
     
  17. Kitecop

    Kitecop New Member

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    I really dont have much room to install a vang. If i did the think the wood boom would still flex enough to minimize the gains from the vang. Not looking to turn this into a racer. I only have about 10" between the base of the mast and the boom and no way to reef to raise the boom
     
  18. LaLi

    LaLi Active Member

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    You do need a vang. Without one, the boat will be a pain offwind in anything but the lightest conditions. It won't turn your boat into a "racer", just "manageable".

    Looking at the pictures, there is plenty of space - a vang is a standard part of boats with much lower booms and more cramped cockpits. And although the boom looks thin, it will never bend nearly enough to significantly offset any vang settings.

    Normal attachment points would be about halfway between the gooseneck and the forward mainsheet block on the boom, and as low as practical on the mast. Even a super-simple, Optimist-style 1:1 piece of rope would be infinitely better than nothing.
     
  19. fhhuber

    fhhuber Member

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    Probably... stock it came with just as simple downhaul to prevent the boom from being pulled up the mast.

    You can sail it without the vang. You just can't optimize the sail for all conditions without the vang.
     
  20. Kitecop

    Kitecop New Member

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    Could i attach to the wood block the mast sits on?
     

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