AMF Windflite leaking

Discussion in 'Sunfish Talk' started by wardie, Aug 28, 2016.

  1. wardie

    wardie Member

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    I want to install the block I purchased a year ago and the only way to do it on the Windflite is through a port I would have to install. I decided to do this first instead of leak test because I could inspect the trunk inside and install my main sheet block. I thumped the deck listening for hollow versus solid sounds and felt I was correct in the placement of the hole but it looks like I've caught a small portion of the foam block. I chipped away some foam at an angle so I can get to the trunk and main sheet block location. I am attaching photos. I did notice what seemed to be a hole like thing I can feel it with my finger. I'm going to vacuum everything then acetone the trunk base and fill that area with epoxy/fiberglass resin. when it cures flip the boat and do the same on the bottom opening and let that cure. By that time it has hardened I 'll have the main sheet block on and I'll be ready to leak test.

    daggerboard port side.jpg oops.jpg
     
  2. wardie

    wardie Member

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    also has anyone noticed the darker slightly wet area under the scraps of foam at the rear of the dagger board?
     
  3. Light and Variable Winds

    Light and Variable Winds Well-Known Member

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    I'd caution everyone to be careful when "feeling around" for internal leaks in raw fiberglass, as you might get blood on the Styrofoam and daggerboard trunk. :oops: On a white deck, don't leave spots of blood for long—they're very hard to remove or paint over. :(

    On the other hand, the DNA in your blood can prove that you're the owner of this boat. :confused:
     
  4. wardie

    wardie Member

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    I looked down the dagger board slot from the top and could see where the material is coming away not sealed and I'll start there. This forum has truly been wonderful and I went back many years and saw that some of you were original posters! So cool many of you have stuck with the forum which allows us newer guys a chance at learning from some of the best Sunfish people out there. I'm playing on attending the Devils Lake Regatta Sept. 17th and 18th to watch, learn , ask questions and enjoy some good racing. Anyone else attending or racing?
     
  5. wardie

    wardie Member

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    on my Depiersa bailer. I did not see an o ring on the metal housing where it mounted to the hull. Is it okay to just run a bead of 5200 sealant on the metal housing and install a new round gasket where the nut tightens the bailer to the inside of the hull??

    Also when I pulled my brass plug one of the o rings was shredded the other intact. I am going to carefully remove the one that is intact and take it to an Advance Automotive they have metric and sae o rings and you can only buy one. Would anyone need the size for reference?

    BTW PB Blaster is one heck of a product to spray on several times throughout the day and it really penetrates the threads I loosened the bailer nut with a 1 3/16" box wrench with no problem. Once I get it sorted out I'll use never seize on the threads when I put her back together.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  6. beldar boathead

    beldar boathead Well-Known Member

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    5200 would be very unwise if you think you might ever want to remove the bailer. Regular silicone would be a better choice.
     
  7. Light and Variable Winds

    Light and Variable Winds Well-Known Member

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    Agree with PB Blaster. An engineer-friend recommends Kroil. On-duty Navy friends use Marvel Mystery Oil mixed with kerosene! Marvel Mystery Oil is just (high-detergent) ATF with a mint scent. :cool:

    Never-Seize comes in different solutions that might react badly in a watery environment. :confused: I'd wrap two or three layers of Teflon tape around the threads instead.

    On O-rings, remember to measure (or compare) for "fatness".

    Regular silicone sealer would be my choice as well. Don't expect a new paint job to stick to it. :(
     
  8. wardie

    wardie Member

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    My mistake I meant 3M sealant. I am taking my time and repairing all hull areas after the dagger board trunk repair. I'll read up on never seize and see if one is compatible. I really don't sail in anything but small lakes no sea water.

    half and half acetone and atf I am told makes an excellent penetrant as well. For ease PB Blaster is my choice.

    I have some airplane/modeler epoxy two part system it doesn't say anything about whether you can use underwater any ideas? Maybe a trip to West Marine is best and use whatever they suggest.
     
  9. Light and Variable Winds

    Light and Variable Winds Well-Known Member

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    West Systems makes a relatively-inexpensive "kit" that may provide enough epoxy and hardener for a daggerboard trunk repair. (There's plenty of fiberglass cloth). I suspect they don't include enough epoxy to help sell their expensive cans. :rolleyes: But there's no substitute, and no hazard or odor from the hardener. Polyester hardener vapors are toxic!

    5200 is a 3M sealant. ;)
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2016
  10. mixmkr

    mixmkr Active Member

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    it's odd, but on a boat that stays in the water, you would NEVER use silicon on ANYTHING below the water line. Seems common on a Sunfish, but it's not like that Sunfishes are moored or anything... Silicon is for deck hardware and stuff like that. Something that you'd probably re-bed down the line. I stopped using anything else other than 5200 on stuff on the yachts I work on, if it's going below the waterline. It never leaks and therefore I never have to disassemble anything...like a thru hull or whatever. If I do remove it, the high quality of it totally outweighs trying to getting it apart again.
     
  11. Light and Variable Winds

    Light and Variable Winds Well-Known Member

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    Edit to add:
    You might try West Systems "Repair Kit".

    I think I paid less than $40 for it; however, don't expect that supply of resin/hardener to go very far. That "repair" kit comes with packets that you tear, and "milk down" the automatic/proper mix. Since there's some waste involved, I'd try a wood dowel of 3/8" diameter to wrap the packet around to assure you're getting all the resin mix out. (Wish I'd thought of that back then). :confused:

    There's enough other useful West Systems stuff included to make the purchase worthwhile anyway. You'll need more Nitrile gloves, available in 100-count boxes from Harbor Freight. Latex gloves also work with West Systems.
     

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