Advice needed on various hull repairs

Discussion in 'Sunfish Talk' started by brianZ71, Jan 24, 2012.

  1. beldar boathead

    beldar boathead Well-Known Member

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    I think not having a bailer is crazy and somewhat dangerous - can get tough to handle the boat when the cockpit is full. And with no coaming you are more likely to get a cockpit full. BB
     
  2. ssshield

    ssshield Member

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    I'm moving from an old Dolphin to the Sunfish. The bailer in the sunfish is one of the most exciting things to me, besides it being faster/lighter. I hate bailing out the damn cockpit of the dolphin after I get home so it doesn't have that last cup or so of water I couldn't get out at the beach.
     
  3. Wavedancer

    Wavedancer Upside down? Staff Member

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    :) Bailing is part of Opti fun:

     
  4. ssshield

    ssshield Member

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    Haha. Yeah. I bought a kayak bailer cup/storage cup for the Dolphin. I keep my keys and a water bottle in it. If I have to bail, it's usually after I'm done sailing.

    On the Sunfish I did an inspection port and and a fat bag :) Bailer takes care of the rest.
     
  5. douglas_zargham

    douglas_zargham Member

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    i'd have to say its a rare that i get my bailer to bail underway - maybe if your booking on a beam reach you can get it to actually work, but it requires concentration. half the time i take on water when i accidently kick out the plug with my heal. my preferred method of bailing is a big sponge, but a bailer is very handy when hosing out your cockpit.

    but i'd definitely get a coaming before putting in a bailer.
     
  6. brianZ71

    brianZ71 Member

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    I haven't sailed a fish with a bailer since summer camp as a kid, but this is what I remember of them too. I think I'm just not going to worry about it for now. Thanks for the input everyone.
     
  7. Kevin Mc

    Kevin Mc Member

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    I vote 'yes' on the self-bailer. I found it a pain to have to keep scooping water out of the cockpit. I've never had trouble with any significant amount of water coming back up through the self-bailer except when the boat's not moving (but that's not "sailing", that's "bobbing"). I also agree with it being useful when cleaning the cockpit out.

    I wouldn't recommend skipping sanding between coats of varnish, as was mentioned in one of the earlier posts. There's a potential for the coats to delaminate; sanding aids in the the coats bonding to one another (as well as removing any larger surface imperfections). This is true with many polyurethanes finishes as well.
     
  8. brianZ71

    brianZ71 Member

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    Good to know on the varnish...too late though haha. If it delaminates I'll sand it all off and redo, not a big deal. I'm only like $9 into the tiller including the polyurethane.
     
  9. brianZ71

    brianZ71 Member

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    Here's a picture update of where I am now.

    This was the last coat of resin I think, showing how I covered it with wax paper to make it cure faster. I found that anywhere that was covered cured hard in 30 min or less. If I left the paper on overnight, the spots where there were air pockets under the paper were still tacky. What I found that worked perfectly was to pull the paper after about 30 min and let it sit uncovered overnight. Then it would all be cured.

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    The shiny spots you can see are where there were air pockets under the paper. This is after sitting overnight. These spots were still tacky and couldn't be sanded.

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    At some point after inhaling a large quantity of resin and solvent fumes, I was bored waiting for something to cure and decided I'd try to glass over the rivets mentioned in my first post. It.....uh.....was unique. Didn't work all that great, but should prevent any leaks from that area. I sanded down what will be visible when the boat is right side up, and It shouldn't be noticeable.

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    I'm using rustoleum topside paint for the bottom of my boat. I've read all over that a quart will easily do 2 coats on an entire sunfish, but not so much in my experience. Maybe my roller was too "fluffy" and i put it on too thick or something, but I've used a little over half a quart and have only done one coat on the bottom. I'll probably end up needing another can. Anyways, on to the pics:

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    repair area:

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    not perfect, but good enough for me. Way better than the duct tape strip that got me through last season. You can see a little "peak" in the middle. This is where the two halves of my backing mold met. I knew this would be an issue when I lined them up, but that's as good as I could get it and I'm not too concerned with it.

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  10. brianZ71

    brianZ71 Member

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    oh yeah and i decided to leave that mess on the bow alone for now.
     
  11. sailcraftri

    sailcraftri Well-Known Member

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    You may still only need the one quart as the second coat may not need as much. Did you use the primer? I have painted without primer and with primer and much prefer with the primer.
     
  12. Light and Variable Winds

    Light and Variable Winds Well-Known Member

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    I have a question about those bailers. Enough water bypassed even a restored Sunfish bailer to keep the cockpit wet. :(

    When I broke my supplied onboard bailer, I sealed it off temporarily. Except for the occasional rain, I don't miss it, but I haven't capsized this particular Sunfish yet! :p Since I especially like the challenge of sailing in "Light and Variable Winds"—and even in a "Flat Calm"—I watch the sky and seldom had the issue of too much water in the cockpit.

    In a capsize, I'd expect some shipped-water to leave the cockpit while righting the Sunfish. :oops: Is this a correct assumption? :)
     
  13. Bill Siler

    Bill Siler Member

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    If there's enough wind to kick up waves and get water in the cockpit, there's enough wind to make the bailer work.
     
  14. brianZ71

    brianZ71 Member

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    That's kinda what I was thinking. Now the surface is glossy and "sealed" so hopefully the second coat takes less. No I didn't use primer, but wish I did just because this repair is going to take a bunch of coats of paint to cover the color.

    Yeah, a good bit of water will dump out when righting a capsized sunfish, but it still will have a bit. In my coaming-less adventures I've sailed to shore with the cockpit completely full and 2 people on board (pushing 400 lbs combined). Needless to say it was sitting with the gunwales almost at the waterline and was a beast to steer!

    ......I started carrying a cup to bail with after that....
     
  15. brianZ71

    brianZ71 Member

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    How are you guys balancing your boat on sawhorses to work on the topside? Or do I just need to resign myself to working on it on the ground?
     
  16. ssshield

    ssshield Member

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    Took my restored '76 out for her maiden voyage yesterday. Bailer worked fine underway. As it bobbed on shore it let in maybe a 1/2" of water into the cockpit. Other than that she was perfecto.

    My experience with paint was the same as yours. I think I used too "fluffy" of a roller as well. I got a lot of runs and it's still tacky under the toerail metal trim even a month later.

    I'll be spraying the next paint project for sure. I had to use two $50 cans of Epifane topsides paint to get two coats on my boat. A HVLP paint gun and a compressor would have paid for itself on this project alone, and looked a hell of a lot better.

    Paint looks good from 10' away, but not so great up close. Good enough for having fun though.

    I'm going to run a bead of clear silicone around the metal toe rail top and bottom on mine. I smeared tacky paint that squeezed out from under that rail on my ass and then painted half the topside with said ass.

    I'll be doing a lot of thinner wiping down tonight and then seal.
     

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