1974 restoration finally complete

Discussion in 'Laser Talk' started by xflyer95, Aug 15, 2009.

  1. xflyer95

    xflyer95 New Member

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    I bought this 1974 for $400 7 or 8 yrs ago to restore....although I had never sailed one. It sat in a field covered with a tarp. Luckly!...I found this forum and so many of you that were willing to share endless help and advise. Here are some of the before and after pics. The rest of the after pics will follow. Thanks Eric
     

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  2. Wavedancer

    Wavedancer Upside down? Staff Member

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    Hull looks great!
    Now, get it wet :D
     
  3. xflyer95

    xflyer95 New Member

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    Here are some after pics . The hull no. is 12716 even though the used sail shows a much more current no. George, Patrick and Kyle at West Coast Sailing helped me gather every posible upgrade and replacement part that I could get my hands on and put up with me on the phone for months. Thanks Gouv, Kaiser, BjMoose, Marvin Miller Alan D and others for your contributions to the posts that helped me sort this out. Eric
     

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  4. xflyer95

    xflyer95 New Member

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    I wanted a combination of gunwale and hull support so I added "gate post" rods (wish they were stainless) covered with hose. Larger wheels required homemade "mud" flaps
     

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  5. xflyer95

    xflyer95 New Member

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    It's gets wet!! thanks
     
  6. 8817

    8817 Member

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    How did you get the texture on the deck to look so good?
    Was it as rough looking as the hull when you started?

    Mike
     
  7. Bungo Pete

    Bungo Pete Member

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    Very Impressive.

    What did you use for paint? Also, how did you measure/mask etc. to get the two colored hull. I've always wanted to do that - with that color combination as well!

    Keep up the good work
     
  8. xflyer95

    xflyer95 New Member

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    The choice to paint or not to paint the deck was tough. Time will tell if it was a good decision....you can see from the before pic that the deck was not the best. However during the clean-up prep, I was surprised how well it improved. There are posts that really helped on this.
    I work with body shops in my line of work (painless dent repair) and I my hometown shop is one of the best...and they agreed to paint the whole boat for $500 if I helped with the prep etc. I believe the white (auto) paint was a single stage ..but I will call them this week and verify. It laid out nicer then I thought it would ...I was afraid of losing the texture from the factory. They may have added a flex agent, like they use with plastic items like bumper covers) to keep it flexible.
    The question of the day is with all the painting and such that I did was whether I created a "cheater" boat in the process. My goal has always been to restore the old boat as an old boat that fuctions and looks like a STOCK newer boat.

    Hope this helped! Good luck, E Guv
     

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  9. xflyer95

    xflyer95 New Member

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    Pete..Thanks for the kind words. I work with a great body shop in my home town ( I do paintless dent repair) and they agreed to paint the boat for $500 if I helped with some of the details (that I really wanted to do myself anyway). I research laser images everywhere in search of the best pics that showed the exact location of the waterline stripe on the newer boats. You can't get measurements but you can get "proportions" of the grey stripe vs the white at the two key points....the bow (approx 4/5 from the deck) and the stern..(what ever it is). By comparing the pics when it comes time to locate these most important points you can do well.
    Note that the goal is to pass an imaginary plane thru the hull it the waterline...you must not be distracted by the placement of the deck with respect to this paintline...they are not parallel.
    Here is what we did.
    1. We painted the hull white and let is stand for the prescribed time.
    2. Standing back from the side we compared the hull pics to my hull and located the point on the bow and stern where the paintline/waterline intersects and made marks in those locations.
    3. Level the boat (still upside down) so that the marks at the bow and stern are level with respect to the shop floor. this is not super super critical but will reduce variables!
    4. Note: Since the hull is such an irregular shape compared to most cars I did NOT use the same technique that one uses in striping a car...standing at the front looking back with the tape in outstreched hand ...trying to bring the tape in ....alligning it down the sides as you progress to the front. I came up with a way I call "pin the tail on the donkey".....stay with me
    5. Attach the masking tape ( there is a specific masking tape product that is real elastic for this purpose ) to the mark on the stern.
    6. move away from the stern with the tape streched taught to position 6-8 feet off the bow.
    7. Squat down to a position so that your eye is level with the mark on the bow.
    8. Raise the tape in front of your eye and allign your eye, the tape and the mark..exactly
    9. Smoothly and deliberatly move forward and pin the tail on the donkey...just ease forward holding the tape the exact same distance from the floor until it rests against the mark on the bow. Do not look anywhere but at your target...the donkey...the tape between the stern and the bow will take care of itself!

    If I had to do it all over I would sit in an office chair with nice smooth wheels and have someone push me towards the boat while I held the tape at the right height.

    Hope this helps...I'll find out what paint we used this week. Eric
     
  10. marvin-miller

    marvin-miller Arrrr...

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    That's got to be one of the nicest (and cleanest) boats I've seen - beautiful work and it's very inspiring (I need to fix my '82 up like that!). I think you're going to start a trend of boat restoration threads, and rightly so, with results like that why buy a new boat?

    The pics look good - way to go ! :D
    My trailer is a bit different, I used two straps to hold the boat. While it works well the problem is that I sailed a lot on remote lakes that required travel on logging roads to get to.

    The problem with that is rocks and dust. By using straps the boat has some flex on the trailer to it so it's better, in some ways, for support. But, if the straps have dust all over them (as happens after a few hours on a dirt road) and then it rains - basically the straps wet sand the hull ! :eek:

    I put PVC pipes under the trailer to hold the mast and booms in place. I'll be needing to re-do my bottom shortly - good thing I now know where to go for answers! :D;)
     

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  11. xflyer95

    xflyer95 New Member

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    Thanks Marvin for tudoring me over the last week or two on how to upload pics from this #%@&*$ computor!
    One of the reasons that I added the steel rod gunnel/gunwale (whatever) supports to the trailer was that the shop painter suggested that the new hull paint be allowed to cure for around 6 weeks with no contact. So I extended the up 2" each to hold the hull off the hull supports for the duration. One of the problems of my design was since the back rods were not verticle, the distance between them changed drastically when extended.....and I had to remount them to accomodate the boat width. Eric
     

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  12. Kaiser

    Kaiser Member

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    beautiful! Looks like a brand new boat
     
  13. perlSailor

    perlSailor New Member

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    Shazam! That's a gorgeous restoration. You really set the curve. I am just getting started on my '73 project, and you are right about the wealth of knowledge to be had here on this forum. Couple of questions:

    1) The mast step repair/reinforcement pic appears very well lit. Were you working from more than just the one inspection port visible on the fore deck (ie. did you cut a larger hole and glass it back in)?

    2) How far down did you sand the hull before you started painting, and did you have to make any repairs to the fiberglass and/or gelcoat?

    Ditto Marvin on the restoration thread.

    Thanks all.
     
  14. bjmoose

    bjmoose Member

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    Shhweet! Looks really nice. A labor of love for sure.

    One question - knowing now how much work it would be, would you do it again?
     
  15. xflyer95

    xflyer95 New Member

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    It's crazy how bright the pictures came out...the camera used for the "after" pic self adjusts to the light really well! ...and that is with just the one "standard" inspection hole aft of the mast. I would get deep into the threads on the subject and take the time to get it right. Some of the posts from guys like Gouvernail address "big picture" issues such as laying glass in such a way that is allows the mast tube to structurally contribute to the bonding of the deck to the hull and so on...
    I used the mast tube project to add to my tool collection...and bought a sweet dremmel set up with a 3ft flex cable to remove the "bad stuff" at the top and bottom of the step.

    Same goes for the painting...I am NOT a painter but I did do some minor glass work on the stern gunnels. The previous owner had painted the hull with yellow spray paint from a hardware store over the blue gelcoat...and most of it "peeled" away with the help of a razor blade. I did some light sanding to prep for paint..( I think it was ppg single stage car paint) I'm going to find out exactly for the shop soon.

    The question that you guys can answer is .....did I create or end up with a "cheater" boat??? Didn't intend to ...but would not be suprised to find out that the paint and such was a significant alteration from the original.
    If so than that is actually proof that this is truly a pure one design class and that should be celebrated!...no whining.
    Good luck with your project! Eric
     
  16. xflyer95

    xflyer95 New Member

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    Wow ...probably not. This forum ,and places like westcoast sailing, have very fair deals on "turn key" boats all the time...many with dollies, extra rigs and sails. The cost and time make a used boat a no brainer.

    This boat was a gift to me from my wife... and we got it from a real cool girl that died a very tragic death soon after we bought it from her. She really loved it and was very glad that I was commited to restoring it. I plan to take it back by her parents to show them her beloved laser soon ....it will be a very tough visit.

    The expense was probably more than a sane person would spend...but it was 7 or 8 years before I got it together. If it were not for this forum and the ease of "shopping" for stuff with westcoast it would still be sittin there waitin for me.

    But I really love the outcome. Good luck Eric
     
  17. marvin-miller

    marvin-miller Arrrr...

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    I don't know what the 'rules' are but I would suspect there's nothing wrong with your boat as you didn't change it structurally.

    Maybe I'm a little cynical but it seems to me that the rules also result in protectionism by keeping us buying all our Laser parts from one place - at an inflated price.Mind you, I don't do any class racing either - to me there's a LOT more to Laser sailing then racing against identical boats.
     
  18. bjmoose

    bjmoose Member

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    To answer your question about whether it's a cheater boat or not, you could email up all your restoration photos, along with more detailed descriptions of what was done, to one or more of the fleet measurers.

    Just from what you've posted here, it's not obvious one way or the other.
     
  19. xflyer95

    xflyer95 New Member

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    Thanks..I have some additonal before and after pics that I can't seem to get off my iphone....(because i'm a computor idiot)...Marvin M has been kind enough to help me but he really has no clue of what kind of nut case I am when it comes to this stuff!:confused:
     
  20. xflyer95

    xflyer95 New Member

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    I found a few more pics that show before paint and just before installing the grab rails and new rigging
     

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