14.2 expo

Discussion in 'Capri/Catalina 14 Talk' started by c14_rick, Feb 25, 2011.

  1. c14_rick

    c14_rick New Member

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    I am thinking of getting a 14.2 expo, i have sail the 14.2 and enjoy it but now am older want to not race, any reviews of the expo, rick
     
  2. Justwippet

    Justwippet New Member

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    Do it!!!

    Hey Rick,

    I've been sailing my Expo 14.2 for about 2 1/2 years and I absolutely love it. I can rig it in about 5 - 10 minutes at the ramp, sail it in pretty much any kind of weather because of the furling main and there's not a whole lot to break on her. She doesn't sail close to the wind as well as some boats (although definitely well enough) but she screams just off the wind. The seats are plenty comfortable and she'll hold 2 - 3 adults with no problem. I bought her because I was tired of trying to find crew every weekend. The Expo is very easy to singlehand and whoever does decide to go out with you doesn't have to do anything!

    The only caveat about the boat is stepping the mast. The mast is 22' one-piece carbon fiber and it has to be guided down into a hole and onto a pin. It takes some practice and can actually be a deal breaker for some folks. If you can - try it at the dealership or wherever you look at the boat to get an idea of what's involved.

    If all you want to do is get out and sail as quickly and as often as possible? This is the perfect boat! Let me know if you have any questions.

    Jon
     
  3. Bond

    Bond Member

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    Hey Jon,

    I live in Egypt and I'm currently starting to learn surfing in the Nile River close to where I live in Cairo. I also have a weekend house on the red sea where I do a lot of windsurfing. I am contemplating to buy a used C14.2. I will probably sail alone mostly or with my 10 year old daughter. Occasionally I will have friends or family on board as well.

    I wanted to be easy to sail alone and to launch and beach back after sailing. I will have to pull it back on a trolley on the beach and it's not very steep.

    I'm 40 years old and I will have a few beach boys to help with beaching .

    What do you think? Is the Expo a good option for me or should I stick with the standard Mod 3 C14.2?

    What do I really lose when I opt for an Expo with no Jib? What do I gain in your opinion?

    Thanks for your help?
     
  4. bernardd

    bernardd Member

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    I'm 57, have only sailed a few times on vacation since I was a teenager and I bought a lightly used 2007 Expo back in October having been looking for one for some time. Of course there's no water in the local lakes this year so I haven't had a lot of opportunity to enjoy the boat, but from what I've managed to do I'd agree with everything you say - it really is easy to rig and get going.

    I'm actually staggered that I can pretty much pick up that mast complete with the furled sail in one hand! Stepping it is, as you say, a bit fiddly - you've got to get the foot over the pin then rotate the collar but I haven't find it particularly difficult so far.

    I'm not sure if it's just my boat but the thing I find awkward sometimes is getting the outhaul to work smoothly to pull the sail out.

    Another thing that could be easier is lifting the rudder - again it may be just my example but I'm hoping to look at it over the Winter.

    Overall, I'm looking forward to lazy Summer afternoons on the water with totally inexperienced family, rather than racing and it really looks like that's what the Expo is good at.

    Bernard
     
  5. Justwippet

    Justwippet New Member

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    Trade-offs

    Bond,

    The Expo is a great choice - IF - you don't want to race. There's is virtually no tweaking of the sail beyond adjusting the outhaul. If you just want to solo or take 1 or 2 other people out for a nice 2 hour sail? The Expo will be perfect. You can have the boat rigged and ready to sail in less than 10 minutes. Beaching and/or docking are a breeze because you just furl the sail on the way in. Also, if the wind tends to pickup suddenly or gust - the boat is perfect because you can furl the sail a bit and it bends during hard gusts and dumps the wind out of the top of the sail. Plus, the mast is carbon fiber so it doesn't cause the boat to heel. I was out in 15 - 20mph winds this weekend with one other person onboard and had NO problem.

    If you looking for a boat to learn how tweak for the best possible speed or you think you may want to race later on - then you want to look at a standard sloop rigged C14.2. The Expo doesn't point as well as the sloop rig and it can be a little harder to tack in calm to light winds (not much but a little).

    Bottom line? If you want a boat that you can easily solo and have out on the water in a few minutes? Get the Expo. If you want to do serious hardcore sailing and racing? Get the standard 14.2.

    I hope this helps.

    Jon
     
  6. Bond

    Bond Member

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    This is great Jon, very helpful thanks.

    Of course being not experienced at all and just starting my first sailing lessons in the Nile its a bit hard to decide. And I also cant help but feel that the Sloop rig is the real deal and the Expo is just a toy imitation. :)

    I hope I'm mistaken.

    Cheers
     
  7. Justwippet

    Justwippet New Member

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    Not a Toy

    Bond,

    It's definitely not a toy. The idea was to simplify the rig so that you can be on the water quicker and you can solo much easier. If you get the standard rig, you'll need to take someone out with you to work the jib until you reach the point that you're comfortable going out alone (I had a Catalina 16.5 and I personally never felt comfortable soloing that boat). If you're always going to have crew readily available, then that's not an issue.

    The Expo is not a tub - it's still a very fast boat in the right hands. I bought it because I want to SAIL and I can be out on the water (with or without crew) in about 5 minutes. If the winds pick up too much I can furl the sail and still stay out as long as the seas aren't too rough. The boom is higher so your passengers don't have to duck every time you tack. I sail every weekend (weather permitting) for a couple of hours.

    Again, it's going to be personal preference. The bottom line is - if you have an association there and you think that you're going to want to race - get the standard 14.2. If you just want to get out on the water quickly and "fun sail" - get the Expo.
     
  8. Bond

    Bond Member

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    Ok, convincing. But why not if you are solo with the Sloop rig not use the Jib and use only the main sail, wouldn't that be the same and make it easy for solo sailing?

    Pardon my many questions, just trying to understand.
     
  9. Justwippet

    Justwippet New Member

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    Jib

    No problem, Bond.

    It's very difficult to tack without a jib on a sloop rig - especially in light winds. The Expo is a "cat rig" and is designed for a single sail so it tacks with no problems. I used to drop the jib in my 16.5 in heavy winds. I had to execute tacks very quickly or I'd get stuck in irons.

    I've never sailed a sloop-rigged 14.2 so if anyone out there on the forum can add to this that would be great.
     
  10. bernardd

    bernardd Member

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    Thinking back a lot of years I assume it's because dropping the jib moves t he center of pressure (force) from the now single mailsail back relative to the center of gravity (mass?) of the complete boat. As you say, the Expo has the mast a long way forward and furling (reefing) the sail tends to move the center of pressure further forwards.
     
  11. Justwippet

    Justwippet New Member

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    Jib

    Bernardd,

    Absolutely correct. The mast on the Expo is a good bit more forward (and taller) and tacking is not problem. If the sail is furled in any more than about 1/4 the boat Expo gets a little tricky to tack but - otherwise - no issues. Incidentally, the Expo sail is also a bit larger than the standard 14.2's main (but not the total square feet including the jib, of course). The Expo carries 104 sq ft and the standard 14.2 carries 114 total (main & jib).
     
  12. Bond

    Bond Member

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    Expo Cockpit

    A question:

    Is the Expo cockpit identical to the standard C14.2 Mod 3, or are there any differences?

    Does it have the same storage space? I think I read somewhere that the Expo has a built in Ice Box, am I mistaken?

    Any detailed pictures of the cockpit and storage space would be very nice to see.

    Cheers
     
  13. Justwippet

    Justwippet New Member

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    Cockpit

    I'm not sure about the size of the cockpit but I don't think there's any difference. I'm pretty sure that the forward combing is in the same place it's just that the mast is mounted further forward. There are also no stays/shrouds or jib cars so you have a little more room on the rails. The big difference is that the Expo uses the Hoyt system so the boom is much higher than the standard boom and, of course, it doesn't drop down into the boat when you drop (furl) the sail. Basically, you (and, more importantly your wife/girlfriend/kids) don't have to worry about getting hit by the boom when you tack/gibe.

    The Expo comes with a removable cooler that sits down into a well in the forward storage compartment. It's great for packing a picnic lunch!

    I don't have any pictures but here are some good shots that I found at sailboatlistings.com:

    http://www.sailboatlistings.com/view/19468

    I've owned several sailboats (all under 18') over the years and this boat is perfect for me. I don't want to race - I just want to sail for a couple hours a week. The Expo allows me to be in and out on the water very quickly - either with or without crew - and its performance is more than adequate to keep me interested. Plus, if the wind picks up suddenly, I furl the main, hike out and I don't have to worry about capsizing (I'm 51 years old and I have no desire to get wet anymore). If the wind suddenly gusts hard, the tip of the mast bends and the top of the sail luffs and depowers the boat. There have been several instances when I'm the only sailboat under 30-feet out sailing because of the mast design.
     
  14. Bond

    Bond Member

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  15. bernardd

    bernardd Member

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    Do these work?

    http://www.boattrader.com/listing/2006-Catalina-Capri-C-14.2-100150285

    I assume that's a 14.2 Mod 3? I'm pretty sure the Expo is the same hull with the mast moved about 18" forwards, and the Hoyt boom sticking out of the fore deck just behind the mast. You can probably see the similarity to the 3rd picture on this page:

    http://www.boattrader.com/listing/2012-Catalina-Catalina-Expo-14.2-99694118
     
  16. Justwippet

    Justwippet New Member

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    I'm pretty sure you're right, Bernardd. It's the same hull and design except the mast is moved forward the the Hoyt boom is pretty much where the Mod 3's mast would be. The cockpit is the same but there are no jib cars/shrouds.

    Hopefully, Bond will be able to open the links that you provided.
     
  17. Bond

    Bond Member

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    Yes I could see the pics. They all look really beautiful. :)

    And Boat Trader seems like a good source to search for used Expos. The Mod 3 2006 also looks like a boat in a great shape.

    Since we're talking what should I consider when buying a used boat? What should I look for in the standard or the Expo model. There is a possibility that I ask a friend of mine who lives in CA to inspect a boat if nearby. What questions should I ask?

    Basically as experienced owners: what do you look for when purchasing a used boat?
     
  18. Vic Roy

    Vic Roy Member

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    I'm new to sailing but not to old fiberglass boats. Spider cracking or extensive checking in the gel coat is a no-no - very difficult & expensive to repair. These boats are very simple and well built. Not much to go wrong that is not obvious to the eye.

    Vic Roy
     
  19. bernardd

    bernardd Member

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    I'd agree with Vic Roy - particularly in your circumstances the hull absolutely has to be clean and in good condition.

    You also need to check the title of both the boat and the trailer. You can still buy boats that have liens (usually outstanding loans, though there could beother things like divorce settlements) but it's more difficult, particularly from a distance.

    The next up for me was a list of things that aren't show stoppers but which affect the value. The mast and sail are relatively expensive so get those out and check them. On an Expo you probably need to check the mast rotates smoothly.

    The rudder and centerboard are vulnerable and fairly expensive so check for damage, particularly to the leading edge. I crawled under my Expo before I bought it to check the board as well as eyeball the hull.

    Most of the trailers are galvanized but check for major rust, particularly if it's been in the sea. If you're going to tow the boat away the wheel needs to go round, the tires have to be in reasonable shape, the lights have to work etc.

    Hope that helps.

    Bernard
     
  20. Bond

    Bond Member

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    Thanks for the info.

    Since i plan to sail regularly (I'm probably on the beach every other weekend) so the boat will be stored on the beach on the trailer/Dolly and covered. It will be exposed to the sun, wind and all the forces of nature.

    How will I store it? Do I have to remove the mast each time? I see other sailers leaving there masts on (mostly Catamarans). is that ok, or not a good idea?

    If I will leave it on all the time, so what exactly makes the standard model more difficult to get ready to launch than the Expo? Is it just the furling mast?

    Another thing, should I worry about the expo's mast being Carbon Fiber that it maybe weaker than the standard's mast? Or may break easily? Since I live far away replacement won't be easy.

    Appreciate your insights.
     

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